Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Lightning Express broadside - Is this an original?

From: "Paul Wagner" paul_wagner@hotmail.com

I got this [Lightning Express!] broadside from an oldtimer in San Diego who had lots of old California stuff. I thought at the time that it must be a reproduction, but after doing some research, I'm not so sure.

Has this ever been reproduced to your knowledge? Could it be an original, from 1876?

It measures 11" x 17" and the paper is rather stiff. ...

Paul Wagner, San Diego, CA


Lightning Express!

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

The following links may be useful. Take particular note of the paper thickness and size descriptions.

The Lightning Express of 1876:
"the rail trip was routinely accomplished in just about 7 days ... The trains averaged around 500 miles a day, or 20 miles per hour. ... Fast as that may seem for travel 140 years ago, given the motivation and the money, the trip could be made faster, even then—much faster—and it was, but just once until decades later. In 1876, only seven years after the Golden Spike was driven, a train pulled out of the Jersey City Station of the Pennsylvania RR early on the morning of June 1, 1876 and began to speed west along the tracks. All the way to California the mainline was cleared for it. Other trains went onto side tracks for it. Water, coal and supplies were readied for fast loading onto it. Shifts of engineers, firemen, brakemen and conductors were stationed at strategic points along the way to relieve the tired crews with a stop of only a few minutes. As the train raced westward word spread over the telegraph wires that paralleled the tracks. The message was terse, but compelling: 'The Lightning Express is on the way.' Stopping for only the shortest times possible to change equipment and crews, load fuel and supplies, running fast day and night, the train arrived in California on June 4. The trip took just 83 hours and 39 minutes from Jersey City to Oakland—that’s 3 days, 11 hours and 39 minutes. ... "

[continued below]

5/16/2012 10:55 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

1876 "Lightning Express" Railroad Broadside for the San Francisco, California, Virginia and Truckee Railroad, Advertising New Service to the Booming Mining Town of Virginia City, Nevada:
"A spectacular broadside advertising the first through train service connecting the gold and silver fields of Virginia City, Nevada with San Francisco, California. 'Passengers Go Through Direct Each Way Between Virginia City and San Francisco Via Vallejo.' The Transcontinental Railroad, built by Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins, Charles Crocker ,and Collis P. Huntington, (CPRR) opened for traffic on May 10, 1869. This broadside represents one of the earliest known Central Pacific and Virginia and Truckee advertisements. A search of OCLC shows none of these in institutional holdings. A History of the Comstock notes the following: " ... The broadside was printed by H. S. Crocker & Co., 42 and 44 J Street, Sacramento, California. The Virginia and Truckee Railroad was built to serve the Comstock Lode mining communities and northwestern Nevada. The first section constructed from Virginia City to Carson City was started in 1869 to haul ore and mining supplies to the Comstock Lode. ... 15" x 21.5". ... printed on thin paper ... Heritage sold an example of this broadside in our November 2011 Auction 6066, where it sold for $13,095."

1876 Lightning Express Railroad Broadside, Virginia City, Nevada - San Francisco, California Virginia & Truckee Railroad - Central Pacific Railroad:
"15" x 21" ... A spectacular broadside advertising the first through train service connecting the gold and silver fields of Virginia City, Nevada with San Francisco, California. 'Passengers Go Through Direct Each Way Between Virginia City and San Francisco Via Vallejo.' ... This broadside represents one of the earliest known Central Pacific and Virginia and Truckee advertisements. A search of OCLC shows none of these in institutional holdings. A History of the Comstock notes the following: 'The Lightning Express was running daily and the Comstock miners were digging deeper and deeper into the earth beneath Virginia City and Gold Hill.'"

Lightning Express (C. P. R. R.) on Long Ravine Bridge. N. C. N. G. R. R. stopped below –1876.) – Photographer: (J. M. Jacobs), UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library.

"1876 Lightning Express Railroad Broadside (RARE) Sold Date: 01/28/2008 eBay ... an original 1876 Lightning Express Railroad Broadside ... The original owner trimmed the top and bottom of the broadside to fit a frame. ... The Broadside measures 14" x 10" ... thick brown paper."

5/16/2012 10:57 AM  
Blogger CPRR Discussion Group said...

From: "Kyle Wyatt" kylekwyatt@gmail.com

Graham Hardy reprinted the poster in the 1940s (I think) - this may be one.

You can purchase reproductions of that poster on line today.

Bancroft Library has one with the H. S. Crocker line at the bottom (HS
Crocker was original 1870s printer of poster, I think).

ABE Books shows it, but does not currently have any.

—Kyle

5/16/2012 5:42 PM  
Blogger CPRR Discussion Group said...

From: "Kevin Bunker" mikadobear45@yahoo.com

It's most likely a reproduction made about 1969. The size is the same as those; I believe the originals were at least twice that size.

—Kevin Bunker

5/16/2012 5:43 PM  

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