Saturday, May 19, 2018

New edition of book USA by Rail by John Pitt

From: "USA by Rail" information@usa-by-rail.com, pitt.john@gmail.com

I'm the author of the USA by Rail guide book, published by Bradt Travel Guides in the UK and the Globe Pequot Press in North America. The Ninth Edition is being prepared for publication later this year and, like the current edition, will include a recommendation for the CPRR Photographic History Museum as well as your website details. ...

Thank you for recommending the Fifth Edition of USA by Rail on your books page. ...

—John Pitt, USA by Rail

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Promontory Champagne Photo

From: "Kyle Wyatt" kylekwyatt@gmail.com

I am trying to identify as many people as possible in the famous Promontory "champagne" photo, in preparation for an article in an upcoming Trains Magazine issue. Attached is the National Parks guide to the people in the photo, with a couple of additions. Per the attached cropped photos, I am also trying to figure out who is with James Strobridge in the photo. My initial thought is that it might be the Casement brothers (the most logical Union Pacific counterpart to the Central Pacific's Strobridge) - but I have never seen any photos of the Casements without beards.

Thanks for any help you can give.

—Kyle Wyatt



I-227 - Russell - people identified - NPS-2 - with additions
Russell I-227 - people identified




I-227 Russell view - CSRM detail 1 - IDs
Russell I-227




Dan Casement, Russell
Dan Casement, Russell


Jack Casement, Russell 211
Jack Casement, Russell 211




Casements, maybe - I-227 East and West shaking Hand at Laying Last Rail - Oakland Museum crop

Casements, maybe - Russell I-227, East and West shaking Hand at Laying Last Rail


Dan Casement - I-137 Dan Casement and Clerks at Echo City - Oakland Mus H69-459-1956_13AR_3665_F2 crop
Dan Casement - Russell I-137, Dan Casement and Clerks at Echo City


Dan Casement - I-140 DT Casement and Friends, Echo - Beineke, Yale 1078112 crop
Dan Casement - Russell I-140, DT Casement and Friends, Echo


Dan Casement - S-331 Dan Casement, Echo - Oakland Mus H69-459-2271_13AR_3186_F2 crop
Dan Casement - S-331 Dan Casement, Echo


Jack Casement - I-59 Construction Train at End of Track Gen Casement's Outfit Gen in Foreground - Oakland Museum crop
Jack Casement - Russell I-59, Construction Train at End of Track Gen Casement's Outfit Gen in Foreground


Jack Casement - S-211 Russell - Casements Cars, Aspen - Oakland Mus H69-459-2190_13AR_2751_F2 crop
Jack Casement - S-211 Russell - Casements Cars, Aspen


Jack Casement - S-206 General Casement on horseback - Oakland Mus H69-459-2183_13AR_2734_F2 crop
Jack Casement - S-206 General Casement on horseback


Jack Casement and Frances Jennings Casement at wedding in 1857
Jack Casement and Frances Jennings Casement at wedding in 1857


General J.S. Casement
General J.S. Casement


Dan Casement
Dan Casement


Jack Casement - West1910VIIP805
Jack Casement

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Two photo caption corrections

From: "Scott Frizen" kriswil0@comcast.net

Wow, what a great website! Thanks for putting all this together.

... Two photographs in Peter Epstein's "Summit Tunnel, 1999" exhibit need correction. ...

30Lake.jpg has the caption "Sun sets on Donner Lake". The picture appears to be taken from atop the Summit Tunnel (#6) western portal shed looking down on the Old Donner Summit Road just to the north of the underpass with Donner Lake beyond. That's looking eastbound so the caption should read "Sunrise on Donner Lake" (unless my astronomy is wrong).

The same goes for 27Evening.jpg which should read "Beautiful morning light".

Minor details ...

—Scott Frizen

Monday, February 12, 2018

Railroad photographer Gilbert Hassell

From: "Holly Steidlmayer" hsteidlmayer@gmail.com

I am looking for photographs taken in 1907 by Gilbert Hassell, official photographer of the Southern Pacific Company (RR).

He took photos of Colusa County, California for the State Fair in August of 1907. He was based out of San Francisco.

I cannot find any information on him or his photographs and their location. Please help.

—Holly Steidlmayer

Monday, January 08, 2018

Keeping an eye on baggage

From: "Jean-Louis Milesi" jeanlouismilesi@gmail.com

I’m a French screenwriter. I’m working on a script that takes place in 1900. One of my character travels from Seattle, Washington to Sidney, Nebraska in July 1900. I supposed that the junction is Sacramento.

My character travels with several chests and other baggage. And wants to keep an eye on them. So, he travels sitting on all his stuff.

My question is: Where can my character do that in a train? In a passenger car? In a Zulu car? On the roof? With the luggage? With the animals? …

—Jean-Louis Milesi

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Publications sold to passengers on trains

From: "Robert Stoldal" stoldal@cox.net

Interested in articles, information on news stands at depots, and how magazines, newspapers, other items sold to passengers on trains. ...

—Bob Stoldal

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Original California Zephyr over Donner

From: "Andy Payne" atpayne2000@sbcglobal.net

I was recently discussing with a friend who travels on the Amtrak California Zephyr frequently his travels on the original California Zephyr. He noted that the time he took the California Zephyr from the east to California, they went via Donner Pass. Now I am familiar with the respective routes of the City of San Francisco and California Zephyr, and have not heard of the California Zephyr taking Donner instead of Feather River. Have there been any instances where the WP would use SP's Donner Pass? ...

—Andy

Friday, November 17, 2017

Bronze Mallet Heads

From: "John Baker" treasure1869@gmail.com

Can anyone give me an idea on what the numbers represent on these bronze mallet heads? The taller of the 2 was found years ago along the old grade between Golconda and Iron Point. The other was found along the grade close to Toano about 2 years ago. Anyone familiar with number identifications on these mallets?

—John Baker


Bronze Mallet Heads

Bronze Mallet Heads

Bronze Mallet Heads

Wednesday, November 01, 2017

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Tuesday, October 24, 2017

"The useless design features in modern products"

"The useless design features in modern products" by Zaria Gorvett, © BBC, October 24, 2017. (Article)

"It was 1872 in Reno, Nevada and Jacob Davis was worried. The Latvian-Jewish tailor had previously made mostly functional items, such as wagon covers and horse blankets for the workers on the Central Pacific Railroad. But this had all changed two years earlier after a visit from a woman requesting a new product: strong waist overalls ... They were a raging success and soon Davis started making them in blue denim, too. His 'reinforced jeans' were extraordinarily durable, gradually fading but never breaking. He literally could not make enough of them. He needed a patent, fast. He couldn’t afford one on his own, and instead sought help from his wholesaler. Together they received a patent in 1873. The wholesaler's name? Levi Strauss & Co. Today they make around 20 million pairs every year. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]



Blue Jeans Patent

Monday, October 23, 2017

Tunnel No. 7

From: "Andy Payne" atpayne2000@sbcglobal.net

... While going through some material I came across a little note that said Tunnel 7 was originally a tunnel, but then the Southern Pacific daylighted it; later found out they needed a snowshed there because of winter. Would like to know when the tunnel was daylighted and when the snowshed was built. ...

—Andy Payne

Saturday, October 14, 2017

First ride across the transcontinental line

From: "Roland De Wolk" Roland@newsport.org

I am seeking information about the very first ride across the transcontinental line, including date, cost, conditions, and, perhaps best of all, a legit first-person account. ...

—Roland De Wolk

Sunday, October 01, 2017

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Saturday, September 02, 2017

Tunnel #6, the summit tunnel, did they have to build it?

From: "One Luckyduck" oneluckyduck35@gmail.com

I have wondered for years if all the time and expense (or a lot of it) could have been avoided, to build the original transcontinental line, much easier over the actual Donner Pass, and avoid the 2 year battle to build tunnel 6. I have hiked the area for decades and just finished another hike today of the original line over Donner Summit, thru tunnel 6 to Eder and back.

As a retired Engineer and Builder, I am very familiar with shooting grades, and major excavating to build houses on hillsides. It looks to me that the original builders could have turned 20' or so to the South just after crossing the Chinese Wall (heading West) and proceeded Westward on a bench just above the route of the old wagon road, (and subsequently the Lincoln Highway) over the summit, and proceed just to the North the the present lake Mary and end up in the same general summit location, just a little to the West. It would join the original route just West of the original turntable area. This looks like a no-brainer to me.

This would have saved a year and a half or more of precious building time, and been a substantial decrease in cost ... Could it have been required covertly to slow down the CPRR so they would end up having about the same track, and thus the same benefits as the UPRR?

Otherwise they would have been way ahead of the UPRR ...

I would really appreciate your thoughts on this, and any suggested reading concerning this question would be great, also. ...

—Tom Hallendorf, Soda Springs, California

Friday, September 01, 2017

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Friday, August 25, 2017

"What happened to Utah’s Chinatowns?"

"What happened to Utah’s Chinatowns?" by Sharon Sullivan, © Moab Sun News, August 24, 2017. (News Article)

" ... Thousands of Chinese immigrants began moving into the Rocky Mountain West during the 1860's in search of prosperity. By 1869, thousands were coming to Utah to work on the construction of the Central Pacific Railroad. [Christopher W. Merritt, Ph.D.]’s research shows the immigrants left behind a rich historical and archaeological legacy. ...

Free lecture series: The Life of Chinese Railroad Workers in Utah, a presentation by Chris Merritt, [Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer for the Utah Division of State History]
When: Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 6 p.m.
Where: Moab Information Center, corner of Center and Main streets"
[More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Monday, August 07, 2017

"16 Best Train Trips in the World"

"16 Best Train Trips in the World" by Everett Potter, © National Geographic Traveler Magazine, July 18, 2017. (Travel Article)

"After three decades of riding trains all over the world ... I am still thrilled by a classic rail journey. ...

• Switzerland, the Glacier Express

• Russia, from Vladivostok to Moscow aboard the Golden Eagle Trans-Siberian

• New Zealand, the TranzAlpine between Christchurch and Greymouth

• Australia, from Darwin to Adelaide

• California, the California Zephyr

• Canada, the Canadian from Toronto to Vancouver

• Argentina, the Train to the Clouds

• Europe, the Orient Express from London to Venice

• Africa, the Shongololo Express in Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe

• Japan, Train Suite Shiki-shima

• South Africa, the Blue Train from Pretoria to Cape Town

• India, the Royal Rajasthan on Wheels

• Serbia and Montenegro, on Belgrade to Bar

• Swtizerland, on the Gotthard Panorama Express

• Ireland, on the Belmond Grand Hibernian

• United Kingdom, on the Caledonian Sleeper"
[More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Friday, August 04, 2017

The Mountain Wedding Rings

From: "Tristan E" pinkfloydwar@hotmail.com

I have a few simple questions which have lead to every increasingly harder to find answers.

My questions are in relation to the 5 commemorative rings forged from the sprue of the Golden Spike that Hewes had commissioned.

You have it written and stated on your site who the recipients of these rings were (Stanford, Grant, Ames, Seward, Todd). My issue is in trying to track down these commemorative rings there seems to be alot of dead ends or unknown history of where they may currently be. The only one that I am aware of and have seen a picture of is the one that Secretary Seward was given and is currently held on display at the Seward House Museum in New York.

My questions are, do you have any idea on the remaining 4 rings where abouts and also, were all the rings identical to the one held at the Seward Museum? ...

—Tristan

Tuesday, August 01, 2017

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Friday, July 14, 2017

From R.H. McDonald & Co's Illustrated Annual for 1871

From: "Bruce C. Cooper" centpacrr@comcast.net

Dead River Grand Trunk RR:

An advertisement promoting [alcohol] temperance with a railroad theme, from R.H. McDonald & Co's Illustrated Annual for 1871.


Dead River Grand Trunk RR

CPRR steam engine 124 pulling an emigrant train through Trotwood, Ohio in 1883, modern painting

From: "Jim Trimmer" ja.trimmer@gmail.com

The Trotwood-Madison Historical Society has a painting [dated January 5, 1995] depicting a CPRR steam engine [#124] pulling an emigrant train through Trotwood Ohio (just west of Dayton Ohio), on a line operated by B&O [Baltimore and Ohio Railroad] and then Pennsy [Pennsylvania Railroad]. We have it on display and are curious about the subject of the painting. Did CPRR run emigrant trains with their own engines in western Ohio? The explanation I considered is that when taking delivery of new engines from Philadelphia, they brought eastern emigrants west. Good way to pay for delivery. Any help you can supply would be greatly appreciated. The painting is by a local artist. ...

I am attaching photo's of the painting mentioned above. The artist, Victor Denlinger passed away 5-27-2011 at age 91. According to the obituary, he was a commercial artist who also painted for enjoyment. ...

—Jim Trimmer, President, Trotwood-Madison Historical Society



Rails West: In search of a new life, land or wealth, immigrants from the east of the Mississippi and Europe came west on the railroad. Thousands of immigrants paid up to $40 for a third class transcontinental ticket. The accommodations were miserable, dirty and slow. This locomotive number 124 of the Central Pacific Railroad pulling an immigrant train passed through Trotwood, Ohio in 1883. —Vic Denlinger


CPRR steam engine #124 pulling an emigrant train through Trotwood Ohio

CPRR steam engine #124 pulling an emigrant train through Trotwood Ohio

CPRR steam engine #124 pulling an emigrant train through Trotwood Ohio

Saturday, July 01, 2017

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Thursday, June 29, 2017

James Harvey Strobridge having an eye patch

From: "Roland De Wolk" Roland@newsport.org

I have read multiple accounts of Strobridge having an eye patch but every photo I have seen (including that on your site) shows him without.

Is there someone who can explain? ...

I have, I believe, exhaustively examined any all photos of Strobridge and there isn't one yet with a eye patch. (I was at the [California] State Library history room today looking at the images, for example.) Perhaps he preferred not to [have] been that way and removed it before posing. I don't like guessing!

I'm just wondering if you have any thoughts about that?

Regardless, thank you again for your time and work.

Roland De Wolk

Pacific railroad bond, 1865

From: "John Kelsey" xo-xo-x@comcast.net

I have bond #58 of the 1865 railroad bond & would like an estimate of its insurance value. I do not plan on selling it since my great-great-grandfather was E.B. Crocker who was the lawyer for the Big Four. ... My great-grandmother was Jennie Crocker Fassett. ...

Here are the best photos I could take of this Pacific Railroad bond. It is signed by M(W?) R Shaber (Shabir?) on the right side above the coupons. There are 31 coupons still attached and the bond has been cancelled. It's in very good shape other than wrinkled and a couple creases from being folded. ...

If you might comment on the insurance value (just an estimate) I will appreciate it. I have been to the RR Museum in old town Sacramento & the Crocker Art Museum twice each which are 2 great places. ...

Any thoughts will be appreciated.

—John Kelsey


Pacific railroad bond, 1865

Pacific railroad bond, 1865

Pacific railroad bond, 1865

Thursday, June 01, 2017

Pieces of the last mile(s) of track

From: "Dennis Gray" dennis411@outlook.com

While in the Air Force at Hill Air Force Base I was at an award ceremony for Airman of the Year.

A local government, possibly Ogden, gave the winners pen sets made from 1 inch of the original track. The presenter also said that they used to give spikes from the track but that they had run out.

What is the current value of such an item and are they still available?

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Thursday, May 11, 2017

"Golden spikes & steam: Union Pacific marking 150th transcontinental railroad anniversary"

"Golden spikes & steam: Union Pacific marking 150th transcontinental railroad anniversary" by Stuart Chirls, © RailwayAge, May 11, 2017. (News Article)

"Union Pacific this week launched a two-year celebration commemorating the completion of the transcontinental railroad nearly 150 years ago. ...

Union Pacific representatives this week presented Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg with a commemorative golden spike in nearly the exact location where 1860s California Gov. Leland Stanford broke ground for CP in Sacramento. ...

The company introduced UP.com/goldenspike, an interactive website featuring rare photographs and animated maps illustrating the journey through 46 communities in Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California profoundly impacted by the railroad." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

National Train Day - May 10th

Anniversary of the driving of the last spike, formerly "National Train Day."

Tuesday, May 09, 2017

"California names May 10 Chinese Railroad Workers Memorial Day"

"California names May 10 Chinese Railroad Workers Memorial Day", © GBTimes Beijing, 5/9/2017. (News Article)

"The California state assembly on Sunday named May 10 as the California Chinese Railroad Workers Memorial Day.

... nearly 1,200 [sic] Chinese workers are known to have been killed while working in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the most difficult part of the project. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Saturday, May 06, 2017

How old did you have to be to work on the railroad, 1860-1900?

From: "P. Roethel" proethel21@gmail.com

How old did you have to be to work on the railroad, 1860-1900?

Monday, May 01, 2017

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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Track gauge of the Sacramento Valley Railroad

From: "Candace/Rick Mugele" mrscm@inreach.com

What was the track gauge of the Sacramento Valley Railroad? ...

—Rick Mugele

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Southern Pacific History - plan circa 1903 to electrify the San Francisco - San Jose line?

From: "Ron Swenson" solarnations@gmail.com

In the early '70s I was "living in the big city" and decided one morning to take the Del Monte Special (SF to Monterey) from San Francisco to Palo Alto(?) and I paid a few bucks extra to go First Class. There was an extra seat in the Parlor Car at the very back of the train (yes, we could see where we'd been) in a big cushy swivel arm chair. The guy in the other fancy seat next to me was a true train buff, decked out in train buff classic: three piece suit, including the vest with the big watch on a gold chain, a top hat and shoes with spats. Hollywood couldn't have created a more authentic character.

That much is for sure.

He told me a fascinating story: the President of Southern Pacific at the turn of the century had a futuristic vision and had mobilized the company to electrify the SF-SJ line with complete grade-separation when he met an untimely death in 1903. Even though this was a big setback, the company regrouped and began laying plans again, when the earthquake hit. That was just too much, and the plans were set aside.

That story may not have been quite right ...

These days, fact-checking is a whole lot easier; that's how I came across your website and history.

And of course there's Presidents of the Southern Pacific Company ... which reveals that no President of SP met an untimely death around that time.

As you know a great deal about the history of SP, I wonder if you can help me discern what actually transpired back 100+ years ago. Was the visionary leader actually the chief engineer and not the president of SP, for example? Or did the guy just make up the story?

I did notice from Erle Heath's history that electric train lines were actually fairly common in the Bay Area ... and in LA for that matter. So the story is plausible. It's the cast of characters that doesn't quite add up.

Any help in sorting this out would be greatly appreciated. ...

—Ron Swenson, Santa Cruz

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Cost of nitroglycerin for summit tunnel

From: "Karl Pape" kdpape@me.com

Is there any information about how much nitroglycerin cost for tunnel six?

—Karl Pape, Truckee Donner Historical Society

Tuesday, April 04, 2017

Travel in 1870

From: "Susan Hart" glutenfree.hart@gmail.com

Was there passenger train travel available from Burlington, Iowa to Grand Island, Nebraska, in the Spring of 1870?

—Susan Hart

Saturday, April 01, 2017

Branded piece of Rail from northern Utah

From: "James Martin" jfm9999@yahoo.com

I am wondering if the maker of this rail can be identified. The letters appear to be S C G A.

This was found on private property in northern Utah along the stretch that the UPRR sold to the CPRR after the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. It appears to be 60lb/yard rail. ...

—James Martin, Tremonton, Utah


Branded piece of Rail from northern Utah

Branded piece of Rail from northern Utah

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Monday, March 06, 2017

Tracks laid down over the Bay Area shoreline

From: "Joseph Shuster" joeyishuster@gmail.com

I am doing research on the development of the Central Pacific Rail Road, particularly in California. I am currently attempting to understand when and how the tracks were laid down over the Bay Area shoreline (West Berkeley) as I believe that was all marshland back in the 1850's. I was wondering if you guys have any maps of the area, and grading plans, sitework plans, construction plans, land surveys, etc. that could help me distinguish this. ...

—Joey

Wednesday, March 01, 2017

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Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Transcontinental railroad ancestor John Thomas Scupin

From: "Stephen Brooks" stephen@hqlaw.com.au


Hi from Australia,

One of my early Australian ancestors went to the USA and supposedly worked on the Trans Continental Railway.

Is there anywhere where I can find details of those who worked on the railway? I believe he may have been a manager or engineer. His name was John Thomas SCUPIN.

I’d be grateful for any assistance. ...

—Stephen Brooks

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Just wow!

From: "Laura Emerson" noturavg@sbcglobal.net

Hello,

I'm a volunteer at the San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum, currently working on signage for artifacts in our Exhibit Hall. I just spent the last several hours traveling through your website. Of all the websites I have visited in my pursuit of information over the past several months, your website is by far the most comprehensive and entertaining.

Thank you so very much for making all that information available. I doubt there isn't anything you haven't covered regarding the Central Pacific Railroad and the early history of railroading.

When I finally reached the bottom of the [home] page and saw your request for feedback – how could I refuse?

—Laura Emerson

Steam Shovel, Copper Flat, McGill, Nevada

From: "Swanson, Sheila L" SheilaSwanson@creighton.edu

I work at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb. I am attaching a photo ... to see if you can tell me where I can gain permission to include it in our university’s magazine. We are working on a story about “Historical Patterns in American Immigration.” ...

Sheila L. Swanson
Associate Director of Communications
Creighton University
University Communications and Marketing
Omaha, Nebraska


Steam Shovel, Copper Flat, McGill, Nevada
Steam Shovel, Copper Flat, McGill, Nevada

Wednesday, February 01, 2017

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Sunday, January 22, 2017

Transcontinental Mail

From: "Roger Fisette" vetagent@comcast.net

How long did it take for a letter mailed in New York City to reach San Francisco, California in 1869 after the completion of the transcontinental railroad?

Sunday, January 15, 2017

"Historic CPRR Railroad Police Badge Comes Available"

From: "Rick McMorran" rjmcmorran@gmail.com

I know there are some serious CPRR collectors here who might be interested in the change to obtain a historic CPRR Railroad Police badge. This is the same badge that I posted about back on November 25, 2007. This badge was worn sometime between 1862 and 1884.

After 30+ years in law enforcement, I'm thinning out my police insignia collection and have decided to let this one go to someone who would appreciate what it is and display it well. It is available on eBay now.

—Rick McMorran, Black Forest, Colorado


CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge
CPRR Police Badge.
Courtesy of Rick McMorran.

" ... It bears the stamped "N.STAFFORD" hallmark from its maker, typical of CPRR badges of the era. Badge number "82" is stamped in the center of the back. Regrettably, no history is available on who #82 might have been worn by. This is one of two styles used by the CPRR between 1862 and 1884, the other style having 'Special Police' across the top and 'C.P.R.R."'across the bottom, but otherwise the same. It is unknown which style was used first."


Sunday, January 01, 2017

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Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Dates that different names were used along the line from Cisco to Truckee?

From: "Art W. Clark" clarkaw@syix.com

Dates that different names were used along the line from Cisco to Truckee?

Has anyone compiled a list of the dates that different names were used along the line from Cisco to Truckee? Or a map of the same?

Like:

Milepost 1xx
1890-1910 Bill’s
1910-1925 Joe’s
1925 Abandoned

Milepost 18x
1865-1880 Frank’s
1880-1915 George’s
1915 Abandoned

—Art Clark

CPRR letter, 1872

From: "Chris from Trains" tut@PSLN.com

I have a hand written letter on Central Pacific Railroad letterhead from the office of the President, Sacramento dated February 10, 1872. It is addressed to the CEO Bank Of Cal (Assume Bank of California) Mr. S. Franklin.

This letter talks about the Rev. Scott and was written from what appears to be Dave or maybe Daun Z. Yoslz. ...

The back side of the letter is page 3 of notes that Rev. Scott made. Yes, I happen to have pages 1, 2 and 4 of his notes. ...

Anyone have any idea who is the person that wrote this letter? Perhaps the security for the president? To further make this interesting the Rev. Scott wrote what appears to be a church sermon on the back of this letter.

—Chris Skow


CPRR letter 1872-02-10

CPRR letter 1872-02-10