Saturday, July 20, 2019

Exhibition: "Forgotten Workers: Chinese Migrants and the Building of the Transcontinental Railroad"

"Forgotten Workers: Chinese Migrants and the Building of the Transcontinental Railroad" Smithsonian. (Exhibition)

"National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC. May 10, 2019 – Spring 2020." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Transcontinental Railroad Commemorative U.S. Stamps

You can now purchase online the Transcontinental Railroad 150th Anniversary Commemorative U.S. "forever" Stamps from the United States Post Office.

There are three stamps in the series, one showing the CPRR Jupiter locomotive, another showing the UPRR 119 locomotive, and a golden spike stamp.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Western Americana ... RAILROADS - 1875 AND BEFORE

From: "Buckingham Books" sales@buckinghambooks.com

... Listed below are items on RAILROADS - 1875 and BEFORE from our collection. ...

4. DAVIS, JEFFERSON [SECRETARY OF WAR]. REPORTS OF EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS, TO ASCERTAIN THE MOST PRACTICABLE AND ECONOMICAL ROUTE FOR A RAILROAD FROM THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN. MADE UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR, IN 1853-4, ACCORDING TO ACTS OF CONGRESS OF MARCH 3, 1853, MAY 31, 1854, AND AUGUST 5, 1854. Washington: A. O. P. Nicholson, Printer, 1855 - 1861. ... Howes P3 says, "... it was the best cartographical work on the West up to its time and some copies were colored." Wagner/Camp says, "Despite their flaws, these volumes contain a monumental collection of scientific information, geographical, zoological, botanical, geological, of the still mysterious American West. Upon first examination, the volumes seem forbiddingly disorganized; reports clearly were printed as they were received; there is no overall system or arrangement, nor are there general indices to the volumes, and, as Camp has pointed out, there is the usual duplication of printing and lithography by both houses of Congress. However, these faults are amply compensated by the richness of the material within." ... $15000.00 (26611)
HOWES P3. WAGNER/CAMP 262-267. WHEAT 822, 823, 936. MOFFAT 35, 36, 49.

7. WHITNEY, A. MEMORIAL OF A. WHITNEY, PRAYING A GRANT OF PUBLIC LAND TO ENABLE HIM TO CONSTRUCT A RAILROAD FROM LAKE MICHIGAN TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN. Washington: Ritchie & Heiss, Printers, 1846. First edition. 8vo. Senate document 161, 29th Congress, 1st Session, February 24, 1846. ... 10 pp., large folding map of the proposal at the rear. Whitney is requesting a grant of land sixty miles in width from Lake Michigan to the Pacific Ocean,"to be held and set apart expressly to furnish, by sale and settlement, means to construct a railroad to communicate with the two points; and after the full and perfect completion of said work, should there be any lands remaining, your memorialist asked them for himself, his heirs, and assigns, as a reward for the work." The folding map is a map of the United States that shows railroads finished, railroads unfinished, and proposed railroads. Asa Whitney (1797-1872) was in the mercantile business in New York City and "recognized the necessity of a railroad to the Pacific, and was the first to suggest its feasibility, and from 1846 till 1850 urged it upon congress, the legislature of several states, and the public, by personal influence and his writings. He was finally instrumental in securing appropriations in 1853 for the first surveys of the northern, southern, and middle routes, and lived to see communication opened from sea to sea in 1869." ... Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography. ... $595.00 (35788)

20. DEGRAND, P. P. F. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FRIENDS OF A RAIL-ROAD TO SAN FRANCISCO, AT THEIR PUBLIC MEETING, HELD AT THE U. S. HOTEL, IN BOSTON, APRIL 19, 1849. INCLUDING AN ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE OF THE U. STATES; SHOWING THAT, P. P. F. DEGRAND'S PLAN IS THE ONLY ONE, AS YET PROPOSED, WHICH WILL SECURE PROMPTLY AND CERTAINLY, AND BY A SINGLE ACT OF LEGISLATION, THE CONSTRUCTION OF A RAIL-ROAD TO CALIFORNIA, IN THE SHORTEST TIME ALLOWED BY ITS PHYSICAL OBSTACLES. Boston: Dutton and Wentworth, Printers, 1849. Second edition. 8vo. ... 24 pp. P. P. F. Degrand puts forth a convincing proposal for a transcontinental railroad that would travel between St. Louis and San Francisco. He offers comparisons to travel by sea route versus a transcontinental railroad and the amount of dollars realized by traveling by rail. He expresses that the route can be built in five years and the resultant prosperity to all will be tremendous. A convincing proposal and one of the earliest for a transcontinental railroad. ... $1,250.00 (44034)
COWAN p. 183. EBERSTADT 114: 641, 123: 51, 134: 550.

22. LAND DEPARTMENT, UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY. GUIDE TO THE UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD LANDS. 12,000,000 ACRES. BEST FARMING AND MINERAL LANDS IN AMERICA, FOR SALE BY THE UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY, IN TRACTS TO SUIT PURCHASERS AND AT LOW PRICES. Omaha: Land Department Union Pacific Railroad Company, 1870. First edition. 8vo. 8 3/4" X 5 3/4" printed wrappers with map on back cover, 44 pp., introduction, illustrated, maps. The rear cover features a map of portions of Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa. States where land grant bonds are available from the Union Pacific Railroad Company. The frontispiece is a map of the United States that shows the Union Pacific Railroad and its connections. A third map shows counties in Nebraska in 1870, and the Union Pacific Railroad lands, first 200 miles, grants of 1862-64. A description of the Nebraska lands are provided county by county. The available lands are contained in alternate sections of one square mile each, within a breadth of twenty miles on either side of the railroad and extend along the entire line. They extend through central Nebraska, southern Wyoming, and northern Colorado and Utah, and include within their limits the splendid agricultural lands of the Platte Valley, the great natural pastures of the Laramie Plains and the valleys of Lodge Pole Creek and Bear River, and the rich iron and coal fields between the Black Hills and the Wahsatch Mountains. Description, advantages, water resources, climate, soil, live stock raising, farming, markets, timber, minerals, information about homesteads, advantages of living in colonies, etc. Both Adams' Herd and Graff list similar titles but different years and claim their listings to be "rare." ... $2,250.00 (44035) ...

BUCKINGHAM BOOKS
BOOKS FOR THE KNOWLEDGEABLE COLLECTOR
Copyright © 2016 Buckingham Books, All rights reserved.

Nancy Anderson
Buckingham Books, ABAA, ILAB, IOBA
8058 Stone Bridge Road
Greencastle, PA 17225
(717) 597-5657

Saturday, May 18, 2019

"150th anniversary of Transcontinental Railroad kicks off in Truckee"

"150th anniversary of Transcontinental Railroad kicks off in Truckee" by Hannah Jones, © sierrasun.com, May 17, 2019. (News Article)

"A summer-long celebration of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad kicked off with a ribbon-cutting ceremony last week, along with a soft opening of a new Truckee History Railroad Museum at the Truckee Train Depot. 'Visitors to this museum will have a new appreciation for Truckee, the people who lived here, and a newfound pride in this delightful and extraordinary community,' said Katie Holley, president of the Truckee Donner Historical Society. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Sunday, May 12, 2019

"Old Sacramento Celebrates 150th Anniversary Of The Transcontinental Railroad"

"Old Sacramento Celebrates 150th Anniversary Of The Transcontinental Railroad." © CBS Sacramento 13, May 8, 2019. (News Video)

"We talk with the great great great great nephew of Theodore Judah, the engineer of the Central Pacific Railroad." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Historic telegrams tell the story of how the Transcontinental Railroad ushered in new era"

"Historic telegrams tell the story of how the Transcontinental Railroad ushered in new era" by The Associated Press, © The Salt Lake Tribune, May 9, 2019. (Article)

" ... The Baltimore Sun, relying on telegraphed dispatches by other cities and The Associated Press, published the following article on the event and how it was celebrated across the U.S. It first appeared on May 11, 1869. The AP is reprinting it in honor of the Transcontinental Railroad’s 150th anniversary.
... The AP Corporate Archives contributed to this report." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]





Completion of the Pacific Railroad

Official Announcement — Telegraphing the Hammer Strokes — Rejoicing and Congratulation — Ringing of Bells and Other Demonstrations.

Promontory Summit, Utah, May 10, noon. — To the Associated Press: The last rail is laid. The last spike is driven. The Pacific railroad is completed. The point of junction is 1,086 miles west of the Missouri river, and 690 miles east of Sacramento.

LELAND STANFORD, Central Pacific Railroad

T.C. DURANT, SIDNEY DILLON, JOHN DUFF, Union Pacific Railroad
The news received in New York



New York, May 10. — The last spike in the Pacific railroad was driven today at five minutes past 3 o’clock P.M., New York time. San Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Plaister Cove, the end of the cable, were connected with Promontory Point by telegraph, and the hammer strokes on the last spike were duly transmitted according to arrangement.

When the news was received in New York a hundred guns were fired in the City Hall Park, and Mayor Hall forwarded a congratulatory message to the Mayor of San Francisco. A commemorative celebration had previously been held in Trinity Church, at which a telegram forwarded by the Chamber of Commerce to the Chamber in San Francisco was read, and an address delivered by Rev. Dr. Vinton.

After prayer and reading of portions of the Episcopal service, the organ pealed and chimes rung as the large congregation left the church. Flags on the city hall and on many public and private buildings were displayed all day in honor of the great event.



Free trade and the Pacific Railroad

A meeting of the American Free Trade League of New York was held at Cooper Institute tonight at which many of the prominent members of the organization were present. David Dudley Field called the assemblage to order, and Howard Potter presided. Addresses were delivered by William Cullen Bryant and Edward Atkinson, and the following resolution was adopted:

"Resolved, That in the opening of the great Pacific railroad today, connecting New York and San Francisco, we recognize a pledge, not only for one country, one constitution and one destiny, but with a due regard to the revenue, for the freest sort of trade with all countries and all continents."
Ringing the bells in Philadelphia

Philadelphia, May 10. — At 2:30 o'clock P.M. precisely, Philadelphia time, the news was received of the driving of the last spike of the Pacific railroad. Word was sent to the mayor, and in a few minutes the bells in Independence Hall and the various fire stations were rung, drawing crowds into the streets under the impression that a general alarm of fire was being rung. The people soon ascertained the reason of the ringing of the bells, and flags were immediately displayed everywhere. A large number of steam fire engines ranged in front of Independence Hall with screaming whistles and hose carriage bells ringing. Joy was expressed in every face at the completion of this great work of country. The sudden flocking of the people to the State House reminded one of the reception of the news of the surrender of Lee's army, when a similar scene was enacted.


The Rejoicing at Chicago

Chicago, May 10. — The celebration of the completion of the great inter-ocean railroad connection today was the most successful affair of the kind that ever took place in Chicago, and probably in the West. It is entirely impromptu, and therefore almost every man, woman and child in the city did their part toward making it a success. The procession was unique in appearance and immense in length, the lowest estimate putting it down at seven miles. During the moving of the procession, Vice President Colfax received the following dispatch:

"Promontory Summit, Utah, May 10. — Hon. Schuyler Colfax, Vice President: The rails were connected today. The prophecy of Benton is today a fact. This is the way to India.

"G.M. DODGE,

"JOHN DUFF,

"SIDNEY DILLON,

"T.C. DURANT."


This evening Vice President Colfax, Lieut. Governor Bross and others addressed large audiences at Liberty Hall, in which they spoke eloquently of the great era which this day marks in the history of our country. During the evening there was general indulgence in fireworks, bonfires, illumination, &c.
The celebration elsewhere

There was great rejoicing over the event at Scranton, Pennsylvania, where cannon, bells and whistles of locomotives were employed to give eclat to the occasion.

In Buffalo, New York, a large gong was attached to the telegraph wire, and at 2:41 P.M. by the time of that city began to ring out the hammer strokes. The crowd sung the Star-Spangled Banner, and jubilee speeches were made by the orators.

Omaha dispatches say that telegrams from Echo City report that the troubles of the railroad laborers near Piedmont were amicably settled.

"150 years of railroad snow removal in the Sierra"

"150 years of railroad snow removal in the Sierra" by Jerry Blackwill , © Sierra Sun, May 9, 2019. (News Article)

" ... The first surveyors of the transcontinental railroad thought the snows could be handled with the equipment of the day. They planned to use 'Bucker' snowplows almost 20-feet tall pushed by six to nine wood-burning locomotives. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"150 Years Ago, America Was United By Train"

"150 Years Ago, America Was United By Train: Railroads were America's first big business and still help to build U.S. industry" by Thomas Black
and Marisa Gertz , © bloomberg.com, May 9, 2019.
(Article)

" ... Railroads were the nation’s first big business, spawning fortunes for entrepreneurs including Cornelius Vanderbilt and Jay Gould and spurring financial markets. J. Pierpont Morgan, a major financier and railroad shareholder, helped bring stability to an industry plagued by overcapacity and price wars. The most famous agreement, the 'Corsair Compact,' was named for Morgan’s yacht after the banker invited Vanderbilt and Gould aboard in July 1885 and insisted on sailing until the two feuding magnates struck a deal. The result -- which eventually led to price fixing and sharing customers -- triggered a Congressional crackdown, including passage of the Sherman Antitrust Act in 1890. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Building the Transcontinental Railroad: How 20,000 Chinese Immigrants Made It Happen"

"Building the Transcontinental Railroad: How 20,000 Chinese Immigrants Made It Happen" by Lesley Kennedy, © history.com, May 10, 2019. (News Article)

" ... At first railroad companies were reluctant to hire Chinese workers, but the immigrants soon proved to be vital. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

CPRR subsidy bonds, 1887

"Thousands gather to reclaim Chinese railroad workers' place in history"

"Thousands gather to reclaim Chinese railroad workers' place in history" by Chris Fuchs, © nbcnews.com, May 10, 2019. (News Article)

" ... Friday’s commemoration, which officials said drew an estimated 20,000, contrasted from the one held in Promontory in 1969 for the 100th anniversary celebration, when nothing more than a 'passing mention of the Chinese' was made. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Saturday, May 11, 2019

"Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad by Sleeping in a Train Car"

"Celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad by Sleeping in a Train Car" by Jennifer Billock , © smithsonian.com, May 7, 2019. (Caboose Motels)

" ... these authentic cabooses, mail cars and train cars from U.S. railways have been converted to sleeping quarters for train fanatics ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Friday, May 10, 2019

150th Anniversary of the transcontinental railroad.

150th Anniversary of the joining of the rails of the first transcontinental railroad!

May 10, 1869 - May 10, 2019

Central Pacific Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad joined at Promontory Summit, Utah.

Congratulations to our ancestor, Lewis Metzler Clement (the engineer in charge of CPRR construction over the Sierra Nevada mountains of California), and to all the brave pioneers, including the entrepreneurs, engineers, and workers who toiled with him to build the greatest engineering project of the 19th century, entirely with manual labor.

Thursday, May 09, 2019

"Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map"

"Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map" by Kathleen Sullivan, © Stanford News, May 8, 2019. (News Article)

"Stanford Libraries has scanned an 1861 map depicting a proposed route for the railroad that eventually connected California with the rest of the country, making the one-of-a-kind map available for online viewing by people around the world. The Central Pacific Railroad Proposed Alignment Map, which is 66 feet long and 2.5 feet wide, comprises four maps on one continuous roll. Each map is titled: Barmore Station to Clipper Gap; Rattlesnake Bluffs to the summit of the Sierra Nevada; from the summit to the Truckee River; and Dutch Flat to Rattlesnake Bluffs. [The four maps are out of geographical sequence, with map 4 belonging between map 1 and map 2.] The map is often referred to simply as 'The Judah Map' after its maker, Theodore Judah (1826-1863) ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]


Also see,

"California State Archives ‘First Complete Rail Map of the Sierras’ Available Digitally, On Public Display for the First Time"

"Click here to view the digitized Theodore Judah Map on Google Arts and Culture"

Other transcontinental railroad maps

Wednesday, May 08, 2019

"Telling 'The Epic Story Of The Chinese Who Built The Transcontinental Railroad'"

"Telling 'The Epic Story Of The Chinese Who Built The Transcontinental Railroad'" by Meghna Chakrabarti, © wamu.org, May 7, 2019. (Audio interviews)


On Point, NPR Podcast

"Guests

Gordon H. Chang, author of Ghosts of Gold Mountain: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad. Co-director of the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project. Professor of American history at Stanford University. Director of the Center for East Asian Studies. (@Stanford)

Lisa See, great-great granddaughter of Fong Dun Shung, who worked on the transcontinental railroad as an herbalist. Author of On Gold Mountain: The One-Hundred-Year Odyssey of My Chinese-American Family. Participated in the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America oral history project. (@Lisa_See)" [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Building the Transcontinental Railroad: Stanford historian's book shines light on Chinese workers in California ... "

"Building the Transcontinental Railroad: Stanford historian's book shines light on Chinese workers in California ... " by Erin Baldassari, © The Mercury News, May 6, 2019. (News Article)

" ... Now, in preparation for the 150th anniversary of the completion of the historic railroad, a new book by Stanford professor Gordon H. Chang, Ghosts of Gold Mountain, takes one of the most comprehensive looks to date at Chinese railroad workers' lives during that time, pulling from extensive public and private archives, oral histories, and other sources. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Two plays put Chinese American workers center stage in Golden Spike 150 celebration

"Two plays put Chinese American workers center stage in Golden Spike 150 celebration" by Kaitlin Hoelzer, © Deseret News, May 5, 2019. (News Article)

" ... Richard Chang and David Henry Hwang, two Asian American playwrights, are now giving Utah theatergoers the chance to learn the history that they didn't learn growing up. Chang's work Citizen Wong and Hwang's play The Dance and the Railroad are being featured as part of Utah's Golden Spike 150 celebration, which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the transcontinental railroad's completion. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Transcontinental Railroad artifacts set to display together for first time in Utah"

"Transcontinental Railroad artifacts set to display together for first time in Utah" by Hunter Geisel, © kutv.com, May 4th 2019. (News Article)

" ... For the first time, seven significant artifacts from Transcontinental Railroad will be on display together in one place as part of Utah's 150th anniversary of the driving of the Golden Spike ... From May 3 to June 24, people can go to the State Capitol's "peoples' house" to see the free exhibit that showcases the seven artifacts from the Transcontinental Railroad. In the State Capitol's Gold Room, visitors can see the Hewes Gold, Nevada and Arizona Spikes, which were the last three out of four spikes used in the completion of the railroad at Promontory Point on May 10, 1869. Visitors will also see Central Pacific Railroad's former President Leland Stanford's ceremonial mallet, which was used to drive in the spikes, an inscribed piece of the last iron rail installed at Promontory Summit and the 1862 Pacific Railway Act signed by then President Abraham Lincoln. A model 1866 Lever Action Winchester Rifle owned and used by Union Pacific Chief Engineer Grenville Dodge will also be on display. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Chinese workers’ role in US history ignored for decades, but not anymore"

"Chinese workers’ role in US history ignored for decades, but not anymore" by Carl Nolte, © San Francisco Chronicle, May 4, 2019. (News Article)

" ... When the nation celebrated the 100th anniversary of the railroad in 1969, John Volpe, transportation secretary under President Richard Nixon, gave the keynote address.

"Who else but Americans could drill 10 tunnels in mountains 30 feet deep in snow?" Volpe said. "Who else but Americans could drill through miles of solid granite? Who else but Americans could have laid 10 miles of track in 12 hours?"
As Volpe spoke, Philip Choy, then chairman of the Chinese Historical Society of America, sat in stunned silence. He couldn’t believe what he was hearing. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"The meaning of the Transcontinental Railroad"

"The meaning of the Transcontinental Railroad" by Bill Oudegeest, © Sierra Sun, May 3, 2019. (News Article)

" ... TRIUMPHANT COMPLETION ... now that the mass of our people can stop to reflect upon the Grand results which has caused such vast rejoicings over the State within the past week, we shall all begin to see and feel the full value of our State, to Our Country, and to the World, the boundless good which has been achieved for us all by the Grand, Triumphant and Gloriously successful COMPLETION OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD. (California Farmer and Journal of Useful Sciences, May 13, 1869) ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"150th anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad is May 10"

"Flashback Friday: 150th anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad is May 10" by Scott Mall , © freightwaves.com, May 3, 2019. (News Article)

" ... before the transcontinental railroad was completed, a journey across the continent to the western states meant a dangerous six-month trek over rivers, deserts and mountains. Alternatively, a traveler had the option to hazard a six-week sea voyage around Cape Horn, or sail to Central America and cross the Isthmus of Panama by rail, risking exposure to any number of deadly diseases in the crossing. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Celebrating Chinese American's contribution to the Golden Spike Railroad"

"Celebrating Chinese American's contribution to the Golden Spike Railroad" by Marquee Mclain, © abc4.com, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 01, 2019. (News Article)

" ... Michael Kwan and Margaret Yee from the Chinese Railroad Workers Descendants Association joined ABC4 at 4 p.m. to talk about how they're working to make sure their ancestors are recognized. ... The 2019 Golden Spike Conference will tell that story. The conference is bringing many of the world's leading experts to share what we know about the Chinese who lived, worked and sometimes, died while working on the Central Pacific Railroad and what happened to them after the railroad's completion. ... The event is May 8-11, 2019, at the Salt Lake Marriott Downtown City Creek hotel. For more information, visit www.goldenspike150.org." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"A hike along a record-breaking 10 miles of track of the first transcontinental railroad"

"A hike along a record-breaking 10 miles of track of the first transcontinental railroad" by Agnes Constante, © nbcnews.com, May 2, 2019. (News Article)

" ... for Jack Shu’s 67th birthday, he decided he wanted to go on a 10-mile hike in northern Utah. ... On April 28, 1869, a team of Irish and Chinese immigrant workers laid down a record-breaking 10 miles and 56 feet of railroad track on America's first transcontinental railroad, which connected the country from east to west. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Nevada State Railroad Museum "Lecture details Transcontinental Railroad’s effect on average citizens"

"Lecture details Transcontinental Railroad’s effect on average citizens", © Nevada Appeal, Carson City, April 30, 2019. (News Article)

" ... events leading up to the opening of the Nevada State Railroad Museum’s new exhibit, The Transcontinental Railroad: What a Difference It Made.

Railroad Museum director Dan Thielen will give the lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday at the museum, 2180 S. Carson St. The event starts at 6 p.m. ... Thursday, May 9, 2019 ... Thielen will discuss a number of ways the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad affected everyone, including significant changes in communications, food, lifestyle and travel.

Upcoming events at the Railroad Museum include:

Rust, Splinters and Woodpeckers – The New Exhibit at the Nevada State Railroad Museum

When: 6 p.m., May 9, 2019

Where: Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City

Presenter: Wendell Huffman, Curator of History, Nevada State Railroad Museum

Event description: A discussion of the new exhibit on the transcontinental railroad and the role artifacts in the Nevada State Railroad Museum’s collection played in it.

Reenactment of the laying of the Gold and Silver Spikes

When: Noon, May 10, 2019

Where: Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City

Event description: A recreation of the scene at Promontory Summit when the transcontinental railroad was connected. The museum’s locomotives Inyo and Dayton will reprise their roles in the anniversary of the historic date." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Golden Spike celebrations across Utah have taken years of preparation, planning"

"Golden Spike celebrations across Utah have taken years of preparation, planning" by ANNA BURLESON, © the Standard-Examiner, April 28, 2019. (News Article)

" ... The massive celebration scheduled for the first part of May 2019 actually began two years prior when Doug Foxley approached the governor’s office and several legislators with the aim of throwing the biggest party Utah had ever seen. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

"Scholar's search for Chinese railroad workers' history leads to East Coast railways"

"Scholar's search for Chinese railroad workers' history leads to East Coast railways" by Chris Fuchs, © nbcnews.com, April 26, 2019. (News Article)

" ... In the two decades following the 1869 completion of the first transcontinental railroad ... Chinese railroad workers fanned out across the country to help build, maintain and repair at least 71 other rail lines. ... said Stanford University professor Shelley Fisher Fishkin, who uncovered this piece of history and wrote about it in the forthcoming book, The Chinese and the Iron Road: Building the Transcontinental Railroad." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]




The Great National Project

From: "William Reese Co." amorder@reeseco.com

Our new illustrated e-list, The Great National Project: The Development and Impact of the Transcontinental Railroad, consisting of 53 items.

William Reese Company
Rare Books & Manuscripts
ABAA - ILAB
409 Temple Street
New Haven, CT 06511 USA
phone: 203-789-8081 fax: 203-865-7653
www.williamreesecompany.com

Sunday, April 14, 2019

Car seat, April 2, 1867 patent

From: "Dianne Reiken" diannereiken3339@gmail.com

I am looking into purchasing a flip over seat with a patent date of April 2nd 1867. Do you know if they have recast any or is this legitimate? It has a wooden seat that has been replaced a long time ago. ...

—Dianne Reiken


Flip over Rail Car Seat, 4-2-1867 patent

Flip over Rail Car Seat, 4-2-1867 patent

Flip over Rail Car Seat, 4-2-1867 patent



COMMENTS

From: "Kyle Wyatt" kylekwyatt@gmail.com

This will be a multi-part answer, to accommodate a series of images.

[Click links below to see images]
[If the long descriptive filenames interfere with viewing these 35 individually linked pictures, they are also all linked as a group in a single pdf file and also linked as a zip archive.]

Yes, all the castings appear to be legitimate and historic, not modern replicas.

The seat end castings are of the Buntin design, covered by a design patent in 1867, and reissued in 1873.

The original wooden seat (not the present seat), plus related castings, are for the Gardner perforated wooden veneer seat, also covered by a series of patents between 1872 and 1876, with the specific railroad seat version covered by an 1876 patent.

First the Buntin seat end castings. The Buntin seat design normally has a full-size casting at the isle end of the seat (at the front in the photo supplied) and a half size casting on the wall end of the seat. There are a number of Buntin seat ends with a variety of relatively minor detail differences, all covered by the design patent issued in 1867, and reissued in 1873, per attached. The present seat end casting appears consistent with other Buntin seat end castings associated with Gardner veneer seats. The present seat in the photo also appears to use two fill size isle-style seat end castings in order to make a free-standing seat. There are replica Buntin seat end casting sets available, but these seat end castings do not appear to match the details of the replica Buntin seat end castings. I know of no replica castings that are for the distinctive parts of the Gardner veneer seat version of the Buntin seats.

Next the Gardner veneer seat, specifically the version of the Gardner veneer seat that uses a single veneer seat formed for both the seat and the back, and is reversible for direction the seat faces. There are versions of Gardner veneer seats that have separate veneer pieces for the seat and the back. The Gardner Company produced numerous seats and chairs intended for use outside of a railroad car - the railroad car seat portion was only a small part of their overall line of seats and chairs. The patent for the present Gardner reversible seat is from 1876, attached. The original Gardner veneer seat is covered by a pair of patents from 1872, both of which received reissued patents extending their patent period. The single piece (seat and back combined) veneer was patented in 1873.

The following 2 comments will have photos of a surviving example of a Gardner veneer seat of single seat size, with Buntin ends, at the private Double T Agricultural Museum owned by Tony Azevedo.

—Kyle Wyatt


1879 Car Bldrs -1

Adams and Westlake 1891 p 274

Car Seat Design - Buntin 1867 D2,609 - East Boston, Mass - with drawing

Car Seat Design - Buntin 1867 D2,609 - East Boston, Mass - reissue RE5,480 1873

Seats - 1884-88 Car Bldrs Dict - 1

1878-12-12 Gardner Perforated seat - 1878 Railway Age Jan-Dec 1878 - Vol 3

Gardner veneer seats with Buntin end castings - Crerar, Adams 1886 ca catalog

Gardner Veneer Seats in 1884-88 Car Bldrs Dict - Fig 1131 & 1139

181,571 - Seat, reversible - Gardner 1876 - New York

127,044 - Seat, perforated veneer - Gardner 1872 - Glen Gardner, NJ

127,044, reissue 1876 re 7,202 - Seat, perforated veneer - Gardner 1872 - Brooklyn, NY

127,045 - Seat, perforated veneer - Gardner 1872 - Glen Gardner, NJ

127,045, reissue 1876 re 7,203 - Seat, perforated veneer - Gardner 1872 - Brooklyn, NY

127,045, reissue 1876 re 7,203, reissue 1880 re 9,094 - Seat, perforated veneer - Gardner 1872 - Westfield, NJ

139,568 - Seat & Back, perforated veneer - Gardner 1873 - Glen Gardner, NJ

181,571 - Seat, reversible - Gardner 1876 - New York



From: "Kyle Wyatt" kylekwyatt@gmail.com

Here is a set of photos of a Gardner veneer seat with Buntin ends from Tony Azevedo's private Double T Agricultural Museum taken in 2014 when it was in storage. Note this seat has a shaped wooden piece supporting the Buntin wall end castings (instead of using a second isle end casting as in the present seat example).

—Kyle


Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 1

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 3

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 4

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 5

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 6

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 7

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 8

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 9

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2014-8-24 Double T Ag Mus 10



From: "Kyle Wyatt" kylekwyatt@gmail.com

Here is a set of photos of a Gardner veneer seat with Buntin ends from Tony Azevedo's private Double T Agricultural Museum taken in 2018 after it was placed on display.

—Kyle


Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 1

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 2

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 3

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 4

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 5

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 6

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 7

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 8

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 9

Gardner Reversible Coach Seat - Tony Azevedo Coll - 2018-4-7 Double T Ag Mus 10

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

CPRR Museum mentioned in Places Journal

From: "Deborah Lilley" deborah@placesjournal.org

Greetings from Places, the journal of public scholarship on the built environment.

We've published an article today that might be of interest, and mentions the CPRR Museum (and a special thank-you for Larry Mullaly).

Here's the link: https://placesjournal.org/article/cisco-trash-map/

In Cisco Trash Map, Miranda Trimmier visits the derelict town of Cisco, Utah to reconnect with an old friend and consider "what might be learned in a place littered with disassembled history."

We hope you enjoy the article and will consider passing it on.

—Deborah Lilley, PhD, Managing Editor, Places Journal

Friday, February 15, 2019

20th Anniversary, CPRR Museum Website

Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum

Two decades: 1999-2019

Five million visitors!

Happy 20th Anniversary.

Monday, February 04, 2019

Date tracks were laid in Carlin, Nevada?

From: "Ella Trujillo" etrujillo@cityofcarlin.com

I am trying to find out precisely when the Central Pacific Railroad laid the tracks in Carlin, Nevada. I know frequent telegraph reports of tracks laid were being sent back each day but I can't find this information anywhere. Do you know how I can find out when the tracks were laid in Carlin? ...

—Ella Trujillo, Carlin Historical Society

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Postcard of Samuel Morse's son???

From: "Gary Romele" garyromele@ymail.com

Can you tell me if this Postcard is of Samuel Morse's son from Postcard dated early 1914?

Do you have any information to verify this as Samuel Morse's son, and did he also work as a telegrapher for Southern Pacific Railroad, as the caption indicates? ...

—Gary


Postcard of Samuel Morse's son?

Postcard of Samuel Morse's son?

Friday, December 21, 2018

Transcontinental Railroad Workers, Teens

From: "Dick, Judy" JDick@Scholastic.com

I am an editor at Scholastic Magazines. I researching the building of the transcontinental railroad and was wondering how young the workers were. Did any boys or [teenagers] work on the teams, especially among the Chinese workers? ...

—Judy Dick, Senior Editor, Scholastic Magazines

Sunday, November 04, 2018

"Seventy-Five Years of Progress" by Erle Heath

From: "Ann Scott" scotta@ParmaCitySchools.org

Where can I get a printed copy of the historical sketch Seventy-Five Years of Progress?

—Ann Scott
Ohio

Echo City Photographs

From: "Melissa Jacobson" mdalejacobson@gmail.com

Re: Question about The Swackhamer Pacific Railroad Stereograph Collection

I'm doing research for a documentary, and have been trying to track down an image (see below). I believe the mountain ... is the same mountain in The Swackhamer Pacific Railroad Stereograph Collection, C.R. Savage, Echo City picture (second image below).

Do you have any advice on how to track down this image? Or do you have any more information on "Echo City" – or collections that might have images of this station? ...

—Melissa Jacobson



train-composite Echo City


savage_bas34_echo_city

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Three of the four original spikes reunited in Omaha, Nebraska, for the first time

"The Eighth Wonder of the World’s Crown Jewels" by UPRR, © Inside Track, 10/5/2018. (News Article)

" ... For the first time since that windy day at Promontory Summit, three of the original four spikes driven to honor the transcontinental railroad's completion are being reunited in Omaha, Nebraska ... the silver spike from Nevada, the Golden Spike and the blended spike from Arizona ...

The Race to Promontory: The Transcontinental Railroad and the American West exhibition is on view at Joslyn Art Museum Oct. 6 though Jan. 6, 2019. At the conclusion, the spikes will return to their respective homes; however, the photograph collection will move to the Utah Museum of Fine Arts Feb. 1 through May 26, 2019, and then the Crocker Art Museum June 23 through Sept. 29, 2019." [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Weather during CPRR construction

From: "Camryn Dusthimer" 15920@students.pasd.us

... Where can I find information about what the weather was like during the construction of the Central Pacific Railroad? I’ve been able to find information about the Winter of 1866, but no information about summers and temperatures. ...

"Planning begins for 150-year anniversary of railroad in Truckee"

"Planning begins for 150-year anniversary of railroad in Truckee" by Hannah Jones, © Sierra Sun, October 11, 2018. (News Article)

" ... The Truckee Donner Railroad Society, Truckee Donner Historical Society and the Donner Summit Historical Society are working to organize a Golden Spike celebration ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Monday, October 08, 2018

Phineas P. Gage ... "no longer Gage" (Neurology, Brain, Frontal Lobe Injury)

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

Questions about rail travel in 1878

From: "Rosalyn Eves" rosalyneves@suu.edu

I'm working on a novel set in 1878 in the American West, and a chunk of the story takes place on the UPRR line between Ogden and Cheyenne. I’m trying to figure out a couple of details that I haven’t been able to find in the contemporary accounts I've read (a couple of guide books, etc.).

1. What were the bathroom facilities like? I’ve read of private salons having a small bathroom attached, but it's not clear if this is just washing facilities or also included a toilet. My best guess is that the toilets were (like some primitive trains I've been on in Europe), a toilet seat set over an opening that opened onto the tracks, but I'd like to verify this.

2. Was it possible for passengers to pass between cars on a moving train? The 19th century cars I've seen all have guard rails at the end of the metal platform and around the stairs that would make moving from one car to an adjoining one extremely difficult, but I don't know if that was typical for the period or not. ...

—Rosalyn Eves

Friday, September 28, 2018

Sacramento Shops; Merger

From: "Ken Rattenne" kenrattenne@gmail.com

Just stumbled onto your site while looking for info on the Sacramento Shops. You stated that SP was purchased by UP in 1997. The date for the merger was 9/11/1996. Also, did not notice anything about the purchase of SP by the D&RGW which occurred in 1988. It was DRGW that shifted all heavy maintenance work for diesel locomotives to their Burnham Shops in Denver CO.

—Ken Rattenne

Saturday, September 22, 2018

"Central Pacific" Railroad Quilted piece

From: "Rita Hendon" ritahendon@gmail.com

I have a quilted piece that is framed, I have had for many years. I would like information about the piece and how old it might be? ... Any info would be appreciated. I would like info about its origin ... and value, or collectors I could contact. ...

—Rita Hendon


Quilted piece
"Central Pacific" Quilted Piece
Courtesy of Rita Hendon.

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Town of Cape Horn

From: "Andy Payne" atpayne2000@sbcglobal.net

Going through the route foot by foot and can't help but notice the focus on Cape Horn, but barely anything on a so called "town" of Cape Horn, at around MP 146.3 (next to the Cape Horn Road Crossing). Formerly: C.H. Mills, Cape HornMills, Cape Horn Mill ...

—Andy Payne

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Old linen bag from C.P.R.R.

From: "Chuck Green" chuckgreen@verizon.net

A relative of my wife, Samuel Smith, was a member of "The California 100." After the Civil War he returned to California. He apparently made his way back east at some point. I have some of his possessions including this bag which may have been for payment for wood which he was selling to the railroad. I don’t know how common these [cloth money] bags are and thought you would like to see it.

—Chuck


cloth money bag - Old linen bag from C.P.R.R. - 'Mark Hopkins, Treasurer, C.P.R.R., San Francisco.'
Old linen bag from C.P.R.R.
"Mark Hopkins, Treasurer, C.P.R.R., San Francisco."


Samuel Smith letter
Samuel Smith letter

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Central Pacific Railroad Investor? (A. E. Head or Col. T. H. Head)

From: "Robert A. Eisenberg" raeisenberg@earthlink.net

Can you tell if A. E. Head (Addison) of San Francisco was a stockholder? He was a very close friend and business associate of George and Phoebe Hearst.

Was there a Col T. H. Head involved in the railroad. A Col T. H. Head is #58 in the painting. If there was no T. H. Head could it possibly be Col. A. E. Head. ...

—Bob

Friday, June 15, 2018

Chinese cooks during the building of the transcontinental railroad

From: "Pat Tanumihardja" pat@ediblewords.com

I’d like to find information on the lives of Chinese cooks and other food-related info during the building of the Transcontinental Railroad. I’m hoping to find a story that might interest young people. Do you know of any resources or people I could talk to? ...

—Pat Tanumihardja, Food Writer/Cookbook Author

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

1876 Jarrett & Palmers Transcontinental Express Train CPRR Henry Small 2 Photo's Gold Medal Award

From: "Mark Baker Enterprises" mark@goldrushpaper.com

Just listed on eBay and thought you might like it! ...
1876 Jarrett & Palmers Transcontinental Express Train CPRR Henry Small 2 Photo's


CPRR Transcontinental Express Train, Jarrett & Palmers, 1876
CPRR Transcontinental Express Train, Jarrett & Palmers, 1876

CPRR Transcontinental Express Train, Jarrett & Palmers, 1876, verso



"June 4, 1876 Jarrett & Palmers Transcontinental Train CPRR Henry S. Small Engineer Express Run Photo Two cabinet photographs, ... Engineer Henry S. Small bust photo image ... , no photographer I.D. other photo has 2 images pictured of the medal front and back illustrates Engine no. 149 CPRR, Jarrett & Palmers Transcontinental Train. back side Presented to Henry S. Small by Jarrett & Palmers, June 4 1876. ... back of mount advertising Bradley & Rulofson San Francisco. H.S. Small was the lead engineer on the express run of the Jarrett & Palmer from Ogden to Oakland Train. In 1876, only seven years after the Golden Spike was driven, a train pulled out of the Jersey City Station of the Pennsylvania RR early on the morning of June 1, 1876 and began to speed west along the tracks. All the way to California the mainline was cleared for it. Other trains went onto side tracks for it. Water, coal and supplies were readied for fast loading onto it. Shifts of engineers, firemen, brakemen and conductors were stationed at strategic points along the way to relieve the tired crews with a stop of only a few minutes. As the train raced westward word spread over the telegraph wires that paralleled the tracks. The message was terse, but compelling: 'The Lightning Express is on the way.' Stopping for only the shortest times possible to change equipment and crews, load fuel and supplies, running fast day and night, the train arrived in California on June 4. The trip took just 83 hours and 39 minutes from Jersey City to Oakland — that’s 3 days, 11 hours and 39 minutes. To the amazement of just about everyone, despite a washed-out track in Utah, equipment problems along the way and the vagaries of long distance travel, much of it far from railroad maintenance facilities or major cities, the train actually beat its estimated time of arrival by almost 12 hours. Four of the five railroads involved in the trip exchanged locomotives from time to time along their segments in order to avoid mechanical failure from running the engines hard for long periods of time. But the entire final 875 mile leg of this incredible journey—that part over the Central Pacific’s track — was pulled by a single engine — Central Pacific locomotive #149, called the “Black Fox” — a powerful and fast McQueen Locomotive Works 4-4-0 unit. Although other engineers spelled him, the Black Fox was driven most of the way from Ogden, Utah to Oakland California by Henry S. (Hank) Small, one of the Central Pacific’s most experienced engineers. He pushed #149 and its train very hard over the last, long relay of the journey west. That section of track included the Great Salt Desert, the Humboldt Sink and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. For his endurance and devotion to his job, he was awarded a gold medal by the trip organizers and royally fêted in San Francisco. ... cabinet photo front and back of the Gold Medal and Portrait photo of Henry S. Small."

—calf.covers


Henry Small
Henry S. Small, CPRR Locomotive Engineer

Saturday, May 19, 2018

New edition of book USA by Rail by John Pitt

From: "USA by Rail" information@usa-by-rail.com, pitt.john@gmail.com

I'm the author of the USA by Rail guide book, published by Bradt Travel Guides in the UK and the Globe Pequot Press in North America. The Ninth Edition is being prepared for publication later this year and, like the current edition, will include a recommendation for the CPRR Photographic History Museum as well as your website details. ...

Thank you for recommending the Fifth Edition of USA by Rail on your books page. ...

—John Pitt, USA by Rail

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Promontory Champagne Photo

From: "Kyle Wyatt" kylekwyatt@gmail.com

I am trying to identify as many people as possible in the famous Promontory "champagne" photo, in preparation for an article in an upcoming Trains Magazine issue. Attached is the National Parks guide to the people in the photo, with a couple of additions. Per the attached cropped photos, I am also trying to figure out who is with James Strobridge in the photo. My initial thought is that it might be the Casement brothers (the most logical Union Pacific counterpart to the Central Pacific's Strobridge) - but I have never seen any photos of the Casements without beards.

Thanks for any help you can give.

—Kyle Wyatt



I-227 - Russell - people identified - NPS-2 - with additions
Russell I-227 - people identified




I-227 Russell view - CSRM detail 1 - IDs
Russell I-227




Dan Casement, Russell
Dan Casement, Russell


Jack Casement, Russell 211
Jack Casement, Russell 211




Casements, maybe - I-227 East and West shaking Hand at Laying Last Rail - Oakland Museum crop

Casements, maybe - Russell I-227, East and West shaking Hand at Laying Last Rail


Dan Casement - I-137 Dan Casement and Clerks at Echo City - Oakland Mus H69-459-1956_13AR_3665_F2 crop
Dan Casement - Russell I-137, Dan Casement and Clerks at Echo City


Dan Casement - I-140 DT Casement and Friends, Echo - Beineke, Yale 1078112 crop
Dan Casement - Russell I-140, DT Casement and Friends, Echo


Dan Casement - S-331 Dan Casement, Echo - Oakland Mus H69-459-2271_13AR_3186_F2 crop
Dan Casement - S-331 Dan Casement, Echo


Jack Casement - I-59 Construction Train at End of Track Gen Casement's Outfit Gen in Foreground - Oakland Museum crop
Jack Casement - Russell I-59, Construction Train at End of Track Gen Casement's Outfit Gen in Foreground


Jack Casement - S-211 Russell - Casements Cars, Aspen - Oakland Mus H69-459-2190_13AR_2751_F2 crop
Jack Casement - S-211 Russell - Casements Cars, Aspen


Jack Casement - S-206 General Casement on horseback - Oakland Mus H69-459-2183_13AR_2734_F2 crop
Jack Casement - S-206 General Casement on horseback


Jack Casement and Frances Jennings Casement at wedding in 1857
Jack Casement and Frances Jennings Casement at wedding in 1857


General J.S. Casement
General J.S. Casement


Dan Casement
Dan Casement


Jack Casement - West1910VIIP805
Jack Casement



Russell I-227 d1Russell I-227 view - CSRM detail 1 - ID's


Russell I-225 Last RailRussell I-225 Laying Last Rail Promontory - Oakland Museum - ID's


Russell I-226 Officers UPRussell I-226 Officers of UP Rail Road at Ceremony of Laying Last Rail at Promontory - Oakland Museum - ID's


Notice: Kyle Wyatt has retired from the California State Railroad Museum, March 15, 2018.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Two photo caption corrections

From: "Scott Frizen" kriswil0@comcast.net

Wow, what a great website! Thanks for putting all this together.

... Two photographs in Peter Epstein's "Summit Tunnel, 1999" exhibit need correction. ...

30Lake.jpg has the caption "Sun sets on Donner Lake". The picture appears to be taken from atop the Summit Tunnel (#6) western portal shed looking down on the Old Donner Summit Road just to the north of the underpass with Donner Lake beyond. That's looking eastbound so the caption should read "Sunrise on Donner Lake" (unless my astronomy is wrong).

The same goes for 27Evening.jpg which should read "Beautiful morning light".

Minor details ...

—Scott Frizen

Monday, February 12, 2018

Railroad photographer Gilbert Hassell

From: "Holly Steidlmayer" hsteidlmayer@gmail.com

I am looking for photographs taken in 1907 by Gilbert Hassell, official photographer of the Southern Pacific Company (RR).

He took photos of Colusa County, California for the State Fair in August of 1907. He was based out of San Francisco.

I cannot find any information on him or his photographs and their location. Please help.

—Holly Steidlmayer

Monday, January 08, 2018

Keeping an eye on baggage

From: "Jean-Louis Milesi" jeanlouismilesi@gmail.com

I’m a French screenwriter. I’m working on a script that takes place in 1900. One of my character travels from Seattle, Washington to Sidney, Nebraska in July 1900. I supposed that the junction is Sacramento.

My character travels with several chests and other baggage. And wants to keep an eye on them. So, he travels sitting on all his stuff.

My question is: Where can my character do that in a train? In a passenger car? In a Zulu car? On the roof? With the luggage? With the animals? …

—Jean-Louis Milesi

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Publications sold to passengers on trains

From: "Robert Stoldal" stoldal@cox.net

Interested in articles, information on news stands at depots, and how magazines, newspapers, other items sold to passengers on trains. ...

—Bob Stoldal

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Original California Zephyr over Donner

From: "Andy Payne" atpayne2000@sbcglobal.net

I was recently discussing with a friend who travels on the Amtrak California Zephyr frequently his travels on the original California Zephyr. He noted that the time he took the California Zephyr from the east to California, they went via Donner Pass. Now I am familiar with the respective routes of the City of San Francisco and California Zephyr, and have not heard of the California Zephyr taking Donner instead of Feather River. Have there been any instances where the WP would use SP's Donner Pass? ...

—Andy

Friday, November 17, 2017

Bronze Mallet Heads

From: "John Baker" treasure1869@gmail.com

Can anyone give me an idea on what the numbers represent on these bronze mallet heads? The taller of the 2 was found years ago along the old grade between Golconda and Iron Point. The other was found along the grade close to Toano about 2 years ago. Anyone familiar with number identifications on these mallets?

—John Baker


Bronze Mallet Heads

Bronze Mallet Heads

Bronze Mallet Heads

Wednesday, November 01, 2017

CPRR Discussion Group

Welcome to the CPRR Discussion Group at the Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.

See HOW TO POST to the CPRR Discussion Group.

© 2017 CPRR.org. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the User Agreement which permits personal use web viewing only; no copying; arbitration; no warranty. Only send content intended for publication. Links are not merchant endorsements – caveat emptor. If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate.

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Tuesday, October 24, 2017

"The useless design features in modern products"

"The useless design features in modern products" by Zaria Gorvett, © BBC, October 24, 2017. (Article)

"It was 1872 in Reno, Nevada and Jacob Davis was worried. The Latvian-Jewish tailor had previously made mostly functional items, such as wagon covers and horse blankets for the workers on the Central Pacific Railroad. But this had all changed two years earlier after a visit from a woman requesting a new product: strong waist overalls ... They were a raging success and soon Davis started making them in blue denim, too. His 'reinforced jeans' were extraordinarily durable, gradually fading but never breaking. He literally could not make enough of them. He needed a patent, fast. He couldn’t afford one on his own, and instead sought help from his wholesaler. Together they received a patent in 1873. The wholesaler's name? Levi Strauss & Co. Today they make around 20 million pairs every year. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]



Blue Jeans Patent

Monday, October 23, 2017

Tunnel No. 7

From: "Andy Payne" atpayne2000@sbcglobal.net

... While going through some material I came across a little note that said Tunnel 7 was originally a tunnel, but then the Southern Pacific daylighted it; later found out they needed a snowshed there because of winter. Would like to know when the tunnel was daylighted and when the snowshed was built. ...

—Andy Payne

Saturday, October 14, 2017

First ride across the transcontinental line

From: "Roland De Wolk"

I am seeking information about the very first ride across the transcontinental line, including date, cost, conditions, and, perhaps best of all, a legit first-person account. ...

—Roland De Wolk

Sunday, October 01, 2017

CPRR Discussion Group

Welcome to the CPRR Discussion Group at the Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.

See HOW TO POST to the CPRR Discussion Group.

© 2017 CPRR.org. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the User Agreement which permits personal use web viewing only; no copying; arbitration; no warranty. Only send content intended for publication. Links are not merchant endorsements – caveat emptor. If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate.

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Saturday, September 02, 2017

Tunnel #6, the summit tunnel, did they have to build it?

From: "One Luckyduck" oneluckyduck35@gmail.com

I have wondered for years if all the time and expense (or a lot of it) could have been avoided, to build the original transcontinental line, much easier over the actual Donner Pass, and avoid the 2 year battle to build tunnel 6. I have hiked the area for decades and just finished another hike today of the original line over Donner Summit, thru tunnel 6 to Eder and back.

As a retired Engineer and Builder, I am very familiar with shooting grades, and major excavating to build houses on hillsides. It looks to me that the original builders could have turned 20' or so to the South just after crossing the Chinese Wall (heading West) and proceeded Westward on a bench just above the route of the old wagon road, (and subsequently the Lincoln Highway) over the summit, and proceed just to the North the the present lake Mary and end up in the same general summit location, just a little to the West. It would join the original route just West of the original turntable area. This looks like a no-brainer to me.

This would have saved a year and a half or more of precious building time, and been a substantial decrease in cost ... Could it have been required covertly to slow down the CPRR so they would end up having about the same track, and thus the same benefits as the UPRR?

Otherwise they would have been way ahead of the UPRR ...

I would really appreciate your thoughts on this, and any suggested reading concerning this question would be great, also. ...

—Tom Hallendorf, Soda Springs, California

Friday, September 01, 2017

CPRR Discussion Group

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See HOW TO POST to the CPRR Discussion Group.

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Friday, August 25, 2017

"What happened to Utah’s Chinatowns?"

"What happened to Utah’s Chinatowns?" by Sharon Sullivan, © Moab Sun News, August 24, 2017. (News Article)

" ... Thousands of Chinese immigrants began moving into the Rocky Mountain West during the 1860's in search of prosperity. By 1869, thousands were coming to Utah to work on the construction of the Central Pacific Railroad. [Christopher W. Merritt, Ph.D.]’s research shows the immigrants left behind a rich historical and archaeological legacy. ...

Free lecture series: The Life of Chinese Railroad Workers in Utah, a presentation by Chris Merritt, [Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer for the Utah Division of State History]
When: Thursday, August 31, 2017 at 6 p.m.
Where: Moab Information Center, corner of Center and Main streets"
[More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]