Sunday, January 22, 2017

Transcontinental Mail

From: "Roger Fisette" vetagent@comcast.net

How long did it take for a letter mailed in New York City to reach San Francisco, California in 1869 after the completion of the transcontinental railroad?

Sunday, January 15, 2017

"Historic CPRR Railroad Police Badge Comes Available"

From: "Rick McMorran" rjmcmorran@gmail.com

I know there are some serious CPRR collectors here who might be interested in the change to obtain a historic CPRR Railroad Police badge. This is the same badge that I posted about back on November 25, 2007. This badge was worn sometime between 1862 and 1884.

After 30+ years in law enforcement, I'm thinning out my police insignia collection and have decided to let this one go to someone who would appreciate what it is and display it well. It is available on eBay now.

—Rick McMorran, Black Forest, Colorado


CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge

CPRR Police Badge
CPRR Police Badge.
Courtesy of Rick McMorran.

" ... It bears the stamped "N.STAFFORD" hallmark from its maker, typical of CPRR badges of the era. Badge number "82" is stamped in the center of the back. Regrettably, no history is available on who #82 might have been worn by. This is one of two styles used by the CPRR between 1862 and 1884, the other style having 'Special Police' across the top and 'C.P.R.R."'across the bottom, but otherwise the same. It is unknown which style was used first."


Sunday, January 01, 2017

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Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Dates that different names were used along the line from Cisco to Truckee?

From: "Art W. Clark" clarkaw@syix.com

Dates that different names were used along the line from Cisco to Truckee?

Has anyone compiled a list of the dates that different names were used along the line from Cisco to Truckee? Or a map of the same?

Like:

Milepost 1xx
1890-1910 Bill’s
1910-1925 Joe’s
1925 Abandoned

Milepost 18x
1865-1880 Frank’s
1880-1915 George’s
1915 Abandoned

—Art Clark

CPRR letter, 1872

From: "Chris from Trains" tut@PSLN.com

I have a hand written letter on Central Pacific Railroad letterhead from the office of the President, Sacramento dated February 10, 1872. It is addressed to the CEO Bank Of Cal (Assume Bank of California) Mr. S. Franklin.

This letter talks about the Rev. Scott and was written from what appears to be Dave or maybe Daun Z. Yoslz. ...

The back side of the letter is page 3 of notes that Rev. Scott made. Yes, I happen to have pages 1, 2 and 4 of his notes. ...

Anyone have any idea who is the person that wrote this letter? Perhaps the security for the president? To further make this interesting the Rev. Scott wrote what appears to be a church sermon on the back of this letter.

—Chris Skow


CPRR letter 1872-02-10

CPRR letter 1872-02-10

Monday, December 19, 2016

Unscheduled flag stops on the transcontinental railroad?

From: "Gunnar Bron" ultra.cole2sworld@gmail.com

Hi I am 17 year old Junior at Memorial High School in Manchester, NH. I have been given a project where I create my own journey on the Transcontinental Railroad. All is going well except I could not find a answer to this question.

Would you know if the railroad would stop if I wanted it too, like what I was thinking is in the story I am asking the conductor to stop at the next small town for me and my family to get out and walk around and check out what is there. Would trains of this time do that for me? ...

—Gunnar Bron

Monday, December 12, 2016

UPRR Platte Valley Route 1869 Grand Opening Poster

From: "Cathy Kidd" cathykidd@gmail.com

I believe I have a very rare original poster (14 3/4 inch by 35 3/4 inch) in its original wooden frame from 1869 grand opening. Another photo shows the top. It may be a very old copy. It's in a very old frame. It looks like someone tried to protect it and display it. I'm looking for help to determine value. ...

—Cathy Kidd




UPRR Platte Valley Route 1869 Grand Opening Poster

UPRR Platte Valley Route 1869 Grand Opening Poster
Courtesy of Cathy Kidd.

UPRR Platte Valley Route 1869 Grand Opening Poster

Friday, December 09, 2016

Central Pacific Railroad Passes 1872 (from the President's Office) Signed by Leland Stanford

From: "Todd Somers" todd_somers@yahoo.com

Just in case you, or someone you may know, might be interested in purchasing two original Central Pacific Railroad passes, signed by Leland Stanford, I just wanted to let you know that I have such passes for sale on eBay right now. ...

—Todd


Central Pacific Railroad Pass, 1872

Central Pacific Railroad Pass, 1872
Central Pacific Railroad Pass, 1872
Courtesy of Todd Somers.

Thursday, December 01, 2016

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Saturday, November 19, 2016

Four Million Visitors and counting!

Thanks to the more than 4,000,000 visitors to the CPRR Museum!

Who would have thought that a biography of a railroad building ancestor illustrated by 19th century stereoviews would grow to be so successful? The internet is truly amazing!

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Yuma Arizona as railhead during WW2

From: "Vincent Lacey" vincent.lacey928@outlook.com

I am researching the history of Desert Training Center and the California-Arizona Maneuver Area. The Yuma East Yard is mentioned as a transfer point for Soldiers and a rail head for the Medical and Support personnel. The period of time would be [during World War II] from March, 1942 through March, 1944. Because of all the rail traffic I am wondering where it is or was located. There does appear to be a rail head at Blaisdell.

The Yuma Rail Head was critical to various Truck Heads for delivering supplies to the troops.

Any information on the Rail Head would be appreciated. It could answer questions not only on location but its role ...

—Vincent Lacey, Docent, Yuma Proving Ground Museum and Heritage Center

Saturday, November 12, 2016

'The Origins of American Photography' book by Keith Davis

Tuesday, November 01, 2016

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Saturday, October 15, 2016

"Reopening of Central Pacific Railroad Passenger Station"

"Reopening of Central Pacific Railroad Passenger Station" by Dennis McCoy, © Sacramento Business Journal, Oct. 14, 2016. (News Article)

" ... public reopening of the Central Pacific Railroad Passenger Station in Old Sacramento. The passenger station was reconstructed 40 years ago as a recreation of an 1876 building. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

"Legendary locomotive coming to Cozad Friday"

"Legendary locomotive coming to Cozad Friday", © Lexington Clipper-Herald, October 10, 2016. (News Article)

"Union Pacific will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the railroad reaching Cozad, Nebraska, at a community celebration on Friday, Oct. 14 [2016]. ... by crossing the 100th meridian line ... near Cozad on Oct. 6, 1866, Union Pacific was guaranteed the right to continue westward construction, as stipulated in the Pacific Railway Act of 1862. ... marked with a 100th meridian sign that still stands today. ... " [More]

[Courtesy Google Alerts.]

Saturday, October 01, 2016

Hiking Trail Map of Cisco - Tamarack area

From: "Heidi Sproat" hsproat@truckeehistory.org, tahoeheidi@gmail.com

Planning a hiking trip to (hopefully) view the area where the March 19, 1888 train wreck occurred between "Tamerack" and Cisco. Wrote an article about the wreck in our most recent Echoes Newsletter, pp.4-5.

Looking for any kind of map and hiking trail / rail trail where we might be able to view the area that is the subject of this train wreck. The map below will show the specific area. In the right hand side of the map, just below the black horizontal line, look for the T.17.N.R.13.E block and you will see Cisco and Tamerack [sic] Station. For more references for this wreck, see our website Supplemental Content September, 2016 Echoes. ...

—Heidi C. Sproat, Truckee, California
Truckee-Donner Historical Society, Webmaster, Editor of quarterly newsletter Echoes From the Past, eNews editor​ and Volunteer Research Historian


Nevada Country, CA 1880

Map of Nevada County, California
J.G. Hartwell, San Francisco, W.T. Galloway, 1880.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

How was black powder made?

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Southern Pacific Railroad and Steamship Lines Poster - Research Help

From: "Crystal M. Garcia" cgarc074@fiu.edu

... I am a research assistant at the Wolfsonian Museum in Miami, Florida. I was hoping you could help me. We have a Southern Pacific Railroad and Steamship Lines poster in our collection and we don't know when it was made.

There is an artist signature that appears to read "L. Nest" but we don't have any information about him/her either. On the bottom right is the printer, "Mühlmeister & Johler" ...

Any information you have is greatly appreciated.

—Crystal Garcia


Southern Pacific Railroad and Steamship Lines Poster

Friday, September 16, 2016

Lucin Cutoff, 1904

From: "Brian Craddock" wf5232@austin.rr.com

When was the original track that passed through Promontory Summit in northern Utah abandoned? I've been up there several times, and it looks like the end of the world. My railroad atlas shows the east-west track now runs considerably south of the Transcontinental route. ...

—Brian R. Craddock, Austin, Texas

Thursday, September 15, 2016

How tracks were laid - 10 mile day - Research for New TV Documentary

From: "Vikki Cox" Vikki.Cox@twofour.co.uk

My name is Vikki Cox and I am contacting you from Twofour Broadcast an award winning TV production company based in the UK. We are currently in production for series 3 of our specialist factual series Impossible Engineering. ...

I have been looking back at the history of rail track laying around the world ... about the great race of 1869 and the amazing achievement of CPRR laying over 10 miles in one day. ...

I would really like to try to understand the way in which the tracks were laid, basically the whole process of the construction of the rail. ...

So my questions are:

1. Was the method of laying the track also known as the "cart and wagon" method of track laying. If not- did this process have a name?

2. The description of how the track was laid for the famous 10 mile challenge - is that basically the same method used on normal working days, just less continuously?

3. Was the train that brought the materials running along the freshly laid track? - is that the single track that is referred to when describing the crew jumping off and lifting the empty carts to that the full ones can pass underneath?

4. Would it be true to say that as the track foreman H.H. Minkler was the driving force behind these continuous process, which was then kept in motion and supported by the 4,000 strong workforce?
...


—Vikki Cox, Assistant Producer, Twofour

Tuesday, September 06, 2016

'China Grade' a transcontinental railroad novel by Ray Hosler

From: "Ray Hosler" rayhosler@gmail.com

I have written a novel about the transcontinental railroad, and did a lot of research, including your website.

If you could ... post it on your site for people to review, I would be grateful.

This is more than a first draft, more like a final draft out for historical review. ...

Link to my personal website where the PDF is located for download ... "a free PDF of China Grade, a novel about the transcontinental railroad. My only request is that you leave feedback and tell me what you think. Any historical corrections would be greatly appreciated." ...

—Ray Hosler

Thursday, September 01, 2016

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Saturday, August 27, 2016

Ho! For California! (California, Nevada, and Utah Lands for Sale)

From: "Pat Edens" pattipat.pe@gmail.com

I have in my possession, what I believe is an original flyer produced by B.B. Redding when he was land agent for C.P.R.R. It is clearly old and was framed some time ago. It is identical to the flyer on page 283 of Mr. Williams 1876 edition of The Pacific Tourist only slightly larger [9 1/4" tall]. It used blue and red ink to accentuate some of the lines. ...

—Tom Edens


Ho! For California!

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Jasper Stahl (1844-1909) - Captains and pilots of CPRR steamers

From: "Heidi Cavagnolo" hcavagnolo@gmail.com

My great grandfather was the pilot of the CPRR steamer Apache from at least 1881 until at least 1884, based on San Francisco City directories.

He was a pilot before this time and after until at least 1901. I don't know if the other steamers that he captained or piloted over the years were also for CPPR.

They were:
1893 Sonoma
1893 Aurora
1898 Onward
1901 Onward

Do you have a list of the steamers that were owned by CPRR and/or a list of the pilots/captains of the ships that CPRR owned between 1871 and 1909? ...

—Heidi Cavagnolo

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Antelope's tender trucks

From: "Greg Vaughn" gbv1154@earthlink.net

Is it possible to get a high resolution scan of the Antelope's tender trucks and any information you might have about their design? ...

—Greg Vaughn


Antelope's tender trucks, detail
Antelope's tender trucks, detail
Courtesy CPRR Museum

Monday, August 08, 2016

First tie plates

From: "Milepost Oneninety" milepost190@yahoo.com

When were the first tie plates used in the Donner Summit area? And, what sized rail were they used with?

—Tom H.



CPRR tie plate

CPRR tie plate

CPRR tie plate

CPRR rail

Monday, August 01, 2016

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Saturday, July 30, 2016

Cast Iron Journal Box Cover (wheel bearing), CPRR 1865

From: "David Tuckfield" david@allawgp.com

My grandfather, who worked for the railroad in salt lake and Ogden area had this iron plaque among his possessions. Do you know what this is and what it might be from?


Cast Iron Journal Box Cover (wheel bearing), 1865
[Cast Iron Journal Box Cover (wheel bearing), CPRR c. 1865]

Friday, July 22, 2016

Trout Creek - Truckee - Water Rights

From: "Denny Dickinson" echosdad@hotmail.com

Does the anyone in the CPRR Group have any information about water rights on Trout Creek in Truckee starting in 1863 to 1952?

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Second track

From: "Frank Natturri" famattjr@gmail.com

Was another track ever laid beside the original single track from Sacramento to Ogden? Or did multiple tracks come into existence only with other railroads and routes?

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Identify train in German comic book

From: "Sven-R. Schulz" Predantus@t-online.de

... I am publishing a printed magazine (fanzine) on topics related to the German comic book series Mosaik. The issue coming end of 2017 is intended to be about the American Old West. In one of the comic books which has been released 1971, a railroad is shown ... Can you tell me which model it could possibly be (or which model could be similar to the one on the picture)?

The artists were often inspired by old photographs or engravings, but since a lot of time has passed since then, they can’t remember now.

Unfortunately, all our previous research was unsuccessful, so we hope you can help me. Maybe you can also tell me something about the railway wagon? I would be very glad about an answer; and perhaps it’d even be possible to send an old picture of the engine?


Cartoon

Cartoon
Comic book cartoon train.
Courtesy Mosaik.

Monday, July 11, 2016

What companies manufactured the iron or steel rail for the train tracks?

Friday, July 08, 2016

Two articles from 'The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine', 41(1), November, 1890

Two articles from The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine Volume 41, Number 1, November, 1890:

The First Emigrant [Wagon] Train to California, 1841.

The Printing of "The Century", 1890.

Courtesy of the Bruce C. Cooper Collection.

Friday, July 01, 2016

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Wednesday, June 01, 2016

North vs. South

From: "Alex Cooke" pacooke@otcdkids.com

Was there a compromise that allowed this to happen because of tensions between north and south?

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Monday, May 30, 2016

Where did workers sleep?

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Meerschaum Pipe Question

From: "Anthony Johnson" anthony@ajonline.net

... I'm a pipe collector/restorer and several years ago I acquired an antique F.W. Kaldenberg meerschaum pipe made in New York, NY that has the engraving "SHERMANS PASS 8227 FT 10 MAY 68 ROCKY MOUNT" around the rim of the bowl. It seems professionally done at the pipe company or at an engraver. It is also practically in unused condition with a very brittle genuine amber stem. I know from researching the pipe manufacturer that Kaldenberg was the first meerschaum pipe company in the US and operated during the time of the Civil War. From some of the photos I have found, I've discovered that Jefferson Davis actually smoked a meerschaum pipe made by Kaldenberg which is on display in a museum in Virginia, I believe, so they were fairly prevalent and given as special gifts.

I am very puzzled about the engraving though and I need help, hence why I am seeking help from you. I know the date has to refer to '1868' as Kaldenberg was producing top of the line pipes around this time. I know that Sherman's Pass is also referred to as "Evan's Pass". It has to have a special a connection to the Transcontinental Railroad construction to commemorate a completed section or quite possibly as a congratulations on reaching the highest point of the Railroad. I can't find any record of ceremonies or events during which it might have been given as a gift. Quoting from an online research [Wikipedia] reference:

"The Union Pacific reached the new town of Cheyenne in December 1867 having laid about 270 miles (430 km) that year. They paused over the winter to get ready to push the track over Evan's (Sherman's) pass. The Union Pacific connection at Cheyenne to Denver with its Denver Pacific Railway and Telegraph Company railroad line was made in 1870. The new 'railroad' town of Cheyenne (elevation 6,070 feet (1,850 m)) on the new Union Pacific route was chosen to be a major 'railroad' town with extensive railroad yards, maintenance facilities and Union Pacific presence. It was about 35 miles (56 km) from Evans pass and the highest point reached on the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroad — 8,200 feet (2,500 m)."

I've attached a few photos of the engraving around the bowl ...

Anthony Johnson


Kaldenberg meerschaum pipe

Kaldenberg meerschaum pipe

Kaldenberg meerschaum pipe

Kaldenberg meerschaum pipe

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Cost of a one-way railway ticket

From: "Susan Marlow" susankmarlow@gmail.com

I'm a children's author and write historical fiction set in California. I need to know how much a one-way railway ticket from Sacramento, CA, to Kansas City, MO, in the mid-1870s would have cost. It doesn't have to be an exact price. Just a general idea. ...

Susan K. Marlow

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

What kind of writing did the school kids do?

From: Mariana2006@mail.com

What kind of writing did the school kids do after the completion of the transcontinental railroad?

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

National Train Day - May 10th

Anniversary of the driving of the last spike, formerly "National Train Day."

Monday, May 09, 2016

Archives for the CPRR

From: "Ethan Blue" ethan.blue@uwa.edu.au

I found your marvelous website, and have been searching through its masses of information! Incredible stuff!

I'm specifically trying to find correspondence between the CPRR and the federal government — specifically the Department of Labor and the immigration bureau — from the early 20th century. And really, between 1914 and 1945.

As some background, I’m researching the use of CPRR and Southern Pacific trains (as well as a bunch of others) as deportation trains in these years. I’ve read a great many sources kept by the Department of Labor, but have had trouble identifying archival collections that hold the rail companies perspectives.

Any recommendations on where these archives might be found would be very welcome. (I’ve done a quick search through the Southern Pacific records at Stanford University, but have so far come up short.) ...

—Ethan Blue, Senior Lecturer, History, University of Western Australia


Doing Time in the Depression: Everyday Life in Texas and California Prisons (New York University Press, 2012)

Engineering and War: Militarism, Ethics, Institutions, Alternatives. With Michael Levine and Dean Nieusma (Morgan and Claypool, 2013/2014)

Monday, May 02, 2016

How long does it take to travel the Union Pacific Railroad?

"How many passengers fit on the transcontinental railroad?"

"How many passengers fit on the transcontinental railroad?"


This question was asked anonymously, perhaps by a 4th grade student doing a homework assignment.

Can anyone guess what the question means, or suggest any possible answers?

Sunday, May 01, 2016

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Friday, April 29, 2016

Transcontinental Railroad Workers

... Years ago I used to assist an elderly woman by the name of Alice Davis Williams in Monterey, CA. Her father was Frank [William] Davis, who was involved with building railroads with Chinese workers. She wrote down his account of the railroad building in a book entitled 100 Years ago: True stories of Early California’s Gold Mining Days. ...

Friday, April 22, 2016

Restored CDVs of Early Locomotive Engineers

From: "BRYANT, WILLIAM" wbryant553@cbcsd.org

Restored CDVs of Early Locomotive Engineers:

Who were those people?

Friday, April 15, 2016

Print 'The Driving of the Golden Spike' for Cecil B. DeMille 1939 film

From: "Carol Johnson" jjcjcj49@icloud.com

I have found in my house a paper tube that contains a print from May 10,1969 entitled The Driving of the Golden Spike, completed the railroad that helped to unify America. From Cecil B. DeMille's Paramount picture Union Pacific.

Can you give me a value of this? ...

—Carol Johnson


Cecil B. DeMille's Paramount picture Poster

G.J. 'Chris' Graves, R.I.P.

From: "Karen Triest" karenmm38@hotmail.com

... I'm not sure how many of you are friends, or were friends of Chris Graves.

I wanted to let you know that Chris passed away on April 14, 2016, of natural causes. Chris was a wonderful historian, and touched so many of our lives in positive ways. He diligently worked on genealogy cases, changing many lives for the better. Chris loved his home and yard, and kept everything so green and beautiful year round. It is a very sad loss for us all. Chris will be buried in the Newcastle Cemetery, on the hill where he has a view of the foothills.

Please feel free to forward to those who knew and loved Chris as I did.

Peace

—Karen Triest, Loving Daughter


Chris Graves at Bloomer Cut

Chris Graves

William Strang (1836-1880)

From: "Kirsten Brophy" kbrophy@stamfordmuseum.org

Do you have any biographical information, citations or references to a William Strang (NOT the Overland Park Strang); but a William Strang (1836-1880) who was the superintendent of the telegraph line installation for the St. Louis, Lawrence & Denver Railroad & Telegraph Company from c.1870-1879?

He lived in Cleveland, Ohio in 1870 and died in Ohio in 1880.

A family reference regarding the Native American lithic material he collected states that, “Collected on route of Union Pacific RR from St Louis to CO by William Strang, Superintendent of telegraph line construction.”

Any information you can share about William Strang would be most appreciated, thank you! ...

—Kirsten R. Brophy, RPA, Curator of Collections & Exhibitions, Stamford Museum & Nature Center

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Early transcontinental railroad Timetables

From: "Bill Hockinson" pacslsm@cox.net

... Did all the Union Central Pacific [railroad] early Time tables have maps on the verso? Or did some purely have listings of cities/direction and times. I have a 1879 timetable with only direction (westbound/eastbound), cities and times. Several paragraphs regarding excursions ...

—Bill Hockinson

Monday, April 11, 2016

Oakland, California to Cheyenne, Wyoming, 1890

From: "Mac Simpson" mackinnon96816@gmail.com

Aloha,
My name is MacKinnon Simpson. I am a writer/designer in Honolulu. I have done two pictorial histories on rail in Hawaii:
Next Stop Honolulu—The Story of Oahu Railway & Land Company; and,
Streetcar Days in Honolulu—Breezing through Paradise..

Right now I am working on a book about Honolulu Harbor. Three of the people being featured left Honolulu on the steamer Australia in early July, 1890, bound for San Francisco. Their eventual destination was Springfield, Massachusetts. I am trying to flesh out the first part of their trek and have a number of questions:

1) Would they have originally boarded the train on the Oakland Long Pier?

2) We know that they occupied the “drawing car Vinta” (perhaps Uinta).
• Are there any specific descriptions of this car or any like it?
• Are there any photos?
• Did it include sleeping quarters?

3) We know they arrived in Cheyenne, Wyoming at 5:05 am on July 19, 1890.
• When would the train have left San Francisco?
• Are there any timetables that could be scanned as an illustration?
• Did the train have a name?
• Where would they have transferred to the Union Pacific to continue east?

Thanks very much, and I will acknowledge your efforts in the book.

—Mac Simpson

Friday, April 01, 2016

Today is cancelled.

Today is cancelled.

There is no April 1st, in 2016. This is a leap year.



In other news ...

Google's Pedestrian Flypaper Patent
Google's Pedestrian Flypaper Patent

CPRR Discussion Group

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Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.
Copyright © 2016, CPRR.org

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

CPRR Right of Way - Hiking the old grade

From: "Jon F. Thompson" jonfthompson@gmail.com

I'm attempting to find information on the original CPRR right-of-way, areas that have been abandoned and can be hiked. I've searched the Internet but don't seem to be discovering anything. I wonder, can you suggest a resource – books, websites, anything? ...

—Jon Thompson

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Southern Pacific Company Special Agent O.J. Meade c. 1903-1909

From: "Tink & Dawn" g.marshion@comcast.net

Fantastic site ... I need some help ...

I have been trying to find out more about a Special Agent for the Southern Pacific Company, around 1903-1909, named O.J. Meade. He was in the San Joaquin Division, Bakersfield, California, in 1909.

I have two pieces of ephemera from him. One is a letter [See the first document below] to the Sheriff post marked July 7, 1903, about some stolen mirrors from different train cars.

A dispatch written on January 12, 1909, [is] asking Marshall Kelly for help in stopping the "hobo's" from burning the empty cars. [See the second document below.]

I am having a hard time finding any information on him. I am going to put these two pieces up for auction and need a bit more background. Can you possibly help me in finding more of this man? I appreciate all of your help. You have a grand website; I have learned a lot of new things here ... Thanks again.

—George Marshino


O.J. Meade SP document

O.J. Meade SP document

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

CPRR train fares from Iowa to Oakland, CA in 1875?

From: "Joel Pickford" joelpickford@gmail.com

Can you tell me approximately what CPPR passage would have cost per person from Iowa to Oakland, California in 1875? ...

Joel Pickford, Pickford Pictures, Fresno, CA

Saturday, March 19, 2016

Impact on other nations?

From: "Alli Kat" axtee590@gmail.com

Is there any evidence that shows that the U.S. transcontinental railroad possibly influenced other transcontinental railroads in the world and/or had impact on other nations in the world? I can't find much information on the topic online.

Thanks!!
A fellow student in Wichita, KS

Friday, March 18, 2016

Unknown machine, Auburn, California

From: "Mike Monahan" popicoc@gmail.com

Can anyone identify this machine, the picture was taken in Auburn, California. I also have seen the engine itself in old Newcastle photos. ...

—Mike Monahan


First train down Auburn Ravine. Unknown CPPR machine.
First train down Auburn Ravine.

Friday, March 11, 2016

CPRR Locomotive #317 ??

From: "Bill Metnik" bjmetnik@gmail.com

I recently acquired a metallic print of CPRR Locomotive #317 pulling a string of flatbed cars loaded with stage coaches. (See 2 photos attached). Was there such a locomotive or is this just an artist's rendition?

If this was a working engine, where can I obtain its history?

—Bill Metnik


CPRR Locomotive #317 ??

CPRR Locomotive #317 ??

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Unknown Old Photo – SP Train Wreck

From: "William R. Davis" wrdavisjr56@gmail.com

I was going through some old papers and found this original photo. It looks like it might be Southern Pacific rail accident. Do you have images of this already? Or maybe it might be the only one. It looks like it might be a silver photo as it reflects in areas and is mounted to black cardboard. Nothing written on it as far as I can see. Love to know what you think. ...

—Bill Davis



Unknown Old Photo - SP Train Wreck?
Unknown Old Photograph – Southern Pacific Railroad Train Wreck?
Courtesy of William R. Davis.

Friday, March 04, 2016

Rail travel 1875

From: "GERALD THOMPSON Owner" tcanal111@centurylink.net

... I'm writing my grandfather's history. He traveled by rail from Baltimore, Maryland to Topeka, Kansas in 1875.

How can I find the carriers and route?

—Jerry

Tuesday, March 01, 2016

Great Great Grandfather Alexander H. Houston

From: "Juliet Eccles" julieteccles@virginmedia.com

Having just come across your website I am delighted to find information I have been searching for.

Alexander Houston was I believe my great great grandfather. Your article states Alexander died in Honolulu in 1869. Do you know why he was there? His grave is at Lone Mountain, San Francisco. He came from Delaware and married his wife Caroline in Alameda, San Francisco.

I am looking for information about Alexander, his company he ran, his wife Caroline Louisa and his daughter Minnie. Any newspaper cuttings or links to websites would be most helpful.

Minnie married Frank Bowden in 1879 at Calvary Presbyterian Church. They later left to live in England and Frank Bowden started the Raleigh Cycle company. ...

—Juliet Eccles

CPRR Discussion Group

Welcome to the CPRR Discussion Group at the Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.

See HOW TO POST to the CPRR Discussion Group.

© 2016 CPRR.org. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the User Agreement which permits personal use web viewing only; no copying; arbitration; no warranty. Only send content intended for publication. Links are not merchant endorsements – caveat emptor. If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate.

CPRR Museum Category Tags:

,
, ,
,
, , ,


@CPRR #CPRR





Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.
Copyright © 2016, CPRR.org